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SHOW BUSINESS - WILD WILD WEST FAMILIES

PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS BADMAN TURNED BARD-SPOUTER:
Storyline: The cadaverous ham is always centerstage, even when playing support, giving full sepulchral voice to his unique sense of himself.

John Carradine (Richmond Reed Carradine) (1906-1988) - American actor. Outer: Father was a lawyer, painter and poet, as well as an AP journalist in London and mother was a surgeon. Raised in a very creative Greenwich Village household, giving him much support to explore his eccentricities. Began as a painter and sculptor, sketching portraits throughout the South in office building lobbies, after a family quarrel sent him on his way. Decided upon an acting career in New Orleans, and made his stage debut at 19 in a local production of “Camille.” 6’2”, gaunt, craggy, loose-limbed, with a deep voice, thin features, and a naturally dramatic mien. Joined a Shakespearean stock company, and fell in love with the bard, often reciting passages from his works while on the street to startled passersby. Hitchhiked west, supporting himself with sketches. Unable to secure film work, he continued on the stage in local productions, and in his mid-20s, began to appear on the screen, originally under the name of John Peter Richmond. Switched to his ultimate stage name when he signed a Fox contract in his late 20s. Married Ardanelle McCool in 1935, divorced in 1944, 6 sons from union, including actor David Carradine. Had a 5 decade career, playing character roles in more than 220 films, always as an unusual presence, sometimes villainous, and most of the time quite eccentric. Part of John Ford’s stock company, appearing in many of his westerns. Also did leads in horror films, assaying Count Dracula thrice. Best remembered as the preacher in The Grapes of Wrath. Also continued his stage work, appearing in both Shakespeare and other classical roles. Married Sonia Sorel, an actress in 1945, divorced a decade later, 3 more sons, including actors Keith and Robert. His third marriage was in 1957 to Doris Rich, who died in 1971. Contracted one more union to Emily Cisneros in 1974. Died of a heart attack after climbing a long flight of stairs. Supposedly issued the last words, “Ah, Rome. What a beautiful place to die,” despite expiring in Milan. Inner: Known as an eccentric, and called the “Bard of the Boulevard,” for his impromptu Shakespearean recitals upon the street. Vampire at heart, feeding on attention as the blood of life. Bony bard lifetime of incarnating into a highly expressive household, in order to tap into his creativity and give uninhibited life to the well-cooked ham within him. John Younger (1851-1874) - American outlaw. Outer: Father had been a colonel in the Union army, who was killed in 1862 by Kansas Jayhawkers. One of 12 surviving children, 4 of whom became outlaws, in the violent aftermath of the Civil War. 2nd oldest of the 4 outlaws, all of them Confederate sympathizers, contra to the rest of the family. Brothers Coleman (David Carradine), James (Keith Carradine) and Robert (Robert Carradine), were also cousins of Frank (Dennis Hopper) and Jesse James (Sean Penn). Like his siblings, he witnessed the violence of the Missouri-Kansas border skirmishes, and then heard of his father’s murder by Union soldiers. Killed his first man at 15, but was acquitted via self-defense. Joined his brothers in the James gang 3 years after they began robbing in the Missouri area. Killed in a gun duel with Pinkerton detectives, although dropped 2 of them in a fight before he expired. Inner: Violent and confrontational. Trigger finger lifetime of expunging his violence through directly acting out, and having the family support to do so.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS HIGH-KICKING NONCONFORMIST:
Storyline: The outlaw warrior does violent battle with himself in trying to accommodate his creative and martial sensibilities to an information-caged world, before finally finding a precarious balance within himself.

David Carradine (John Arthur Carradine) (1936-2009) - American actor. Outer: Father was actor John Carradine. Product of his first marriage, and one of 6 brothers. Half-brother of actors Bruce, Keith and Robert Carradine. Had a Bohemian upbringing, and a not particularly happy adolescence. Went to San Francisco State, where he studied music theory and composition, then dropped out and led a footloose early life like his father, doing manual labor, experimenting with psychedelic drugs and wandering in search of himself. 6’ 1/2”, lanky and athletic. Served for 2 years in the army, where he formed an entertainment troupe and put on musicals. Married dancer and teacher Donna Becht in 1960, and divorced in 1968, one daughter from the union. Changed his name to David, at the beginning of his acting career, because he didn’t want to be known as John, Jr. Made his professonal debut with the Theater of the Golden Hind in Berkeley, and later signed a contract with Universal Studios, doing small support roles on both TV and film. Appeared on Broadway, eventually starring in 1965 as Montezuma in “The Royal Hunt of the Sun.” After doing a short-lived TV series, as the wandering Western gunman, Shane, he returned to films, mostly in villainous roles. In his mid-30s, he had his breakthrough as Kwai Chang Caine, a wandering kung fu master in the old West in “Kung Fu,” a role initially conceived by martial artist Bruce Lee for himself. Knew nothing about the discipline when he began the series, although later immersed himself in it, enabling him to ultimately make several martial arts instructional videos. Had a son named Free with Barbara Hershey, with whom he had a volatile 6 year relationship, between 1969 and 1975, occasionally making headlines with their stormy antics. Married Linda Giilbert in 1977, one daughter from the union, and after their divorce in 1983, married actress Gail Jensen in 1988. Later reprised his kung fu character in a modern-day update of the earlier TV series. Also starred in other vehicles, most notably as wandering singer Woody Guthrie in Bound for Glory. Along with his siblings, he played Cole Younger in 1980 in The Long Riders, unconsciously reprising his earlier life on film. An undisciplined, natural actor, with sporadic flashes of a keen talent, he was, nevertheless, noncommittal about his larger career, creating a mixed bag of performances in a mixed-bag of films in the U.S. and abroad, some genuinely affecting, but many merely standard fare. A singer and songwriter as well, occasionally giving concerts, and also playing with his band, Soul Dogs. Penned two memoirs “Spirit of Shaolin,” in 1991, and “Endless Highway” in 1995. After many a year of drink and psychotropic drugs, as well as a reputation for being quick-to-anger, he finally sobered up in 1995, and regained control of his life. Divorced in 1997, he wed actress Marina Anderson in 1998 in a three year union. His final marriage would be in 2004 to Annie Bierman. Enjoyed a coda to his career of more than 100 films and TV appearances, with Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 two-part homage to stylized cinematic violence, Kill Bill. Found naked and hanged with ropes around his neck and genitals in a closet in his luxury hotel room by a maid, in what may have been an auto-erotic asphyxiation and subconscious suicide, while filming the ironically titled film, Stretch. Inner: Angry, articulate, slow to mellow with age. Had thought about suicide a number of times in his life, beginning at the age of 5. Into bondage as a form of both meditation and sexual release, which would eventually lead to his death. High-kicking outlaw lifetime lifetime of taking his unfettered sense of self to the stage and the mat and trying to tame it through the disciplinary demands of both craft and a philosophical sense of how an innate warrior has to comport himself in a modern-day cookie-cutter world. Thomas Cole Younger (1844-1916) - American outlaw and Wild West show performer. Outer: Father had been a colonel, parents were Missouri homesteaders. One of 12 surviving children, 8 sons and 4 daughters, of whom 4 sons became outlaws. His father believed in the union, while some sons had Confederate sympathies, dividing the family. Oldest of the 4 outlaw brothers, who were cousins of the infamous Jesse James (Sean Penn). A burly 200 pounder. Brother of John (John Carradine), Robert (Robert Carradine) and James (Keith Carradine). Served with Quantrill’s guerrillas during the Civil War under one of that war’s bloodiest commanders, Bloody Bill Anderson. After his father’s murder by Kansas Jayhawkers in 1862, he joined the James gang and did both bank and train robberies. Participated in the annihilation of Centralia, Kansas with them. Had innate acting abilities, while hiding from the law in Texas, he sang in a church choir and pretended to be a census taker. Following the botched Northfield Minnesota bank raid in 1876 when angry citizens chased after the gang, he was shot 11 times. Despite his wounds, he managed to stand up and bow to some women as he was taken in. Patched up, he was given life imprisonment at the Minnesota State Penitentiary. An honorable prisoner, he was paroled in 1901, and lived out a relatively quiet life, having made peace with himself in prison. Sometimes appeared at local fairs with Frank James (Dennis Hopper), running horse races, and reminiscing, although later had a falling out with him. Also wrote “The Story of Cole Younger, By Himself,” and played in Wild West shows and carnivals, before retiring. An avid reader in later years. Died of a heart attack. Inner: Tall, powerful, commanding, cool under fire. Good sense of humor and very seductive. Incensed outlaw lifetime of acting out of his intense inner violence and its rehabilitation, allowing him to return in similar volatile manner, and slowly come to grips with his dual nature.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS OUTLAW ROMANTIC:
Storyline: The caged bird learns to appreciate the freedom of his song, after being locked up too long, while still remaining tied to the eccentric dynamics of his longtime outlaw family.
Keith Carradine (1950) - American actor. Outer: Father was actor John Carradine. Mother was his 2nd wife, an actress, whom he didn’t see for 8 years after his parent’s acrimonious divorce, following her running off with a young artist. One of 3 brothers, including Robert Carradine, and half-brother of David Carradine. Enjoyed a free-spirited upbringing, with an interest in both music and the theater. 6’1”. Began acting in high school productions and went to Colorado State Univ. as a theater-arts major, but grew bored with school quickly, and came to Los Angeles, where he got a bit role in the musical “Hair,” as his half-brother had done earlier on Broadway. Impregnated actress Shelley Plimpton, although abandoned her, despite ultimately becoming close with their daughter, actress Martha Plimpton, after seeing her for the first time at the age of 4. Made his film debut in Robert Altman’s McCabe and Mrs. Miller in his early 20s, which led to more roles with Altman, as well as other directors, working both in the U.S. and in Europe. Established himself as a likable, sexy performer, augmented by his singing abilities, winning an Academy Reward in 1975 for ‘I’m Easy,’ which he wrote and sang in Nashville. Also played James Younger in The Long Riders, unconsciously reprising, like his brothers, his earlier life together with them. Married actress Sandra Will in 1982, son and daughter from the union, Cade and Sorel, both of whom following their parents’ trade. Divorced in 2000, after falling in love with a co-star, which forced him to live in a trailer for 6 years, while shelling out alimony. His wife subsequently got involved with detective Anthony Pellicano, who wiretapped him, who wiretapped him, and he became a passive part of the subsequent scandal around the latter’s Hollywood machinations that erupted in 2006. Starred in the title role of “The Will Rogers Follies” on Broadway in 1991. His later career has been more sporadic, including a host of B movies, as he has concentrated on other facets of his talents for self-expression. In 2006, he married actress Hayley Dumond, who is nearly a quarter century his junior. Inner: Easy-going, multi-talented, with a far more integrated inner nature than his older half-sibling. Uncaged bird lifetime of following the family footsteps in order to carve his own unique niche in the mass mind, as member of an ongoing gang of creative/destructive outlaws and in-laws. James Younger (1848-1902) - American outlaw. Outer: Father had been a colonel in the Union Army, parents were Missouri homesteaders. 9th of 14 children, 4 of whom became outlaws. 3rd of the 4 turned bad, including Coleman (David Carradine), John (John Carradine) and Robert (Robert Carradine). Handsomest of the quartet, as well as the most easy-going. Fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War, eventually joining Quantrill’s raiders in 1864. Captured by Union troops in Quantrill’s last fight, and held prisoner until 1865. After the war, he started a horse ranch, then joined his cousins, the James gang in 1868, and his older brother Cole in bank robberies about 2 years after they started their criminal spree. Involved in the shoot-out with Pinkerton detectives that killed his brother John, although managed to escape. Shot 5 times in the botched 1876 Northfield, Minnesota raid. Taken into custody, patched up, and given life imprisonment at the Minnesota State Penitentiary. Paroled, along with his brother Cole in 1901. Courted a young newswoman, but when she rejected him, he committed suicide by putting a bullet in his brain. Inner: Not a criminal at heart, rather by association. Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose lifetime of allowing his wilder nature bountiful reign, and then unable to deal with the aftermath of his bottled thoughts and feelings upon release.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS YOUNGEST YOUNGER:
Storyline: The littlest outlaw tags along for the ride in his ongoing free-shooting family, carving a more modest niche for himself somewhere twixt nerd and nuanced actor.

Robert Carradine (1954) - American actor. Outer: Father was actor John Carradine. Mother was his 2nd wife, an actress. One of 3 brothers, younger brother of Keith Carradine and half-brother of David Carradine. Had a free-spirited upbringing just as his siblings did, and like several of them, decided on show business as a career at a younger age than his former fellow Youngers, although wound up lesser known than the others. 5’11 1/2”. Began his film career in his teens with juvenile supporting roles, starting in 1972 with The Cowboys and eventually worked his way into leads, most notably in the Revenge of the Nerds series, playing against his own sense of life. Like his 2 brothers, he played his former self in The Long Riders, as the trio of siblings unconsciously reprised their earlier connection. Had a daughter, actress Ever Carradine, with actress Susan Snyder. Married Edie Mani in 1990, son and daughter from the union. Despite an active career, unable to implant himself in the public mind in the same manner as the rest of his family. Inner: Younger brother lifetime of following in the foot/steps of his fellow outlaw crew, to less effect than the others, in his own search for self within the context of a highly noticeable family, as a prisoner, on some level, of his famous name. Robert Younger (1853-1889) - American outlaw. Outer: Parents were Missouri homesteaders, father had been colonel in the Union Army. Among the youngest of 14 Younger children, 4 of whom were Confederate sympathizers and became outlaws, while the rest pursued more traditional lives. Youngest of the 4 outlaw Younger Brothers, including Coleman (David Carradine), John (John Carradine) and James (Keith Carradine). Their father was murdered by Kansas jayhawkers, which serially turned his older brothers to outlawry. Participated at 12 in the Quantrill massacres, then joined his older siblings in the Jesse James gang about 4 years after they began their legendary careers as totems of Western outlawry. Captured after the aborted Northfield Minnesota raid in 1876, and sentenced to life in prison for murder and robbery. Developed tuberculosis while incarcerated and died there 13 years into his sentence, although he was rehabilitated by the end. His last words to his sister were, “Don’t weep for me.” Inner: Literal younger brother lifetime of imprisonment within family framework, and unlike his other two siblings, unable to see his way to release, preferring to terminate his incarceration through dis-ease.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS STONE-FACED SELF-DESTROYER:
Storyline: The hired gun keeps his roiling emotions on the inside behind a blank facade, and continues to prefer death over the dishonor of being forced to reveal himself to himself.

Alan Ladd (1913-1964) - American actor. Outer: Father was an auditor who died when his son was 4. His English mother remarried a housepainter, and the family moved to Southern California. Had to work after school, but was a good enough swimmer and diver, to win the championship of the West Coast in 1931, despite his small size, 5’5”. An injury dashed his dreams of participating in the 1932 Olympics, and instead he served in the Army Air Force, then toiled at a host of low-paying jobs before a chance meeting with actor Rory Calhoun sent both on an actor’s pathway, playing bit parts in films, and doing radio and local theater. Married Midge Harrold at 23, son Alan Ladd, Jr. became a successful producer, divorced 5 years later. His destitute and alcoholic mother, who had moved in with him, subsequently swallowed ant poison and then died a slow, horrible death in 1937, which had a strong effect on him. Worked as a grip on a major studio lot for 2 years, while showing an extremely modest acting talent, along with a handsome but expressionless face, which limited him to small-time parts, rather than leads. Agent Sue Carol, a former actress, heard him play 2 roles on the radio without realizing it was the same person, and took his career in hand and married him in his late 20s. His son and daughter from his 2nd marriage both went into show business. SC helped him land the role of a lifetime, as an expressionless paid killer in 1942 in This Gun For Hire. Played well off his co-star Veronica Lake (Blake Lively), and the duo appeared in several movies together, while he became a popular star. Many of his scenes were manipulated to give the impression he was much taller. Scored notably in 1953 with Shane, as a retired gunman asked to fight one more time, but most of his movies were formulaic. As his career began to decline, he made a suicide attempt with a gun, shooting himself in the chest, unconsciously paralleling his earlier demise in this series. Survived the self-inflicted wound, and then died a little over a year later of a cerebral edema via an overdose of sedatives and alcohol. Inner: Stiff and self-destructive, with a competitive inability to countenance failure. Holstered lifetime of taking his minimalist talents as far as they could go in the same realm as his hidden outlaw brothers and then opting for self-destruction rather than re-creation when cornered by the posse of his own insecurities. Grat Dalton (Gratton Dalton) (1862-1892) - American outlaw. Outer: Mother was a Sunday-school teacher, father was a drifter. Grew up on a farm, one of 15 children, and one of 4 who went bad, including Bob (Robert Mitchum), Bill (Rory Calhoun) and Emmett (Nick Nolte). Had a limited education. 5’9” and slim. Cousins of the Younger Brothers (the Carradines), who had ridden with their cousin, Jesse James (Sean Penn). Brother Frank (William Boyd) became a U.S. marshal, but was killed by outlaws, which so enraged the oldest quartet, including himself, that they all became marshals, but quickly bored of the life, and were fired after uncovering gambling among powerful men. Also worked with the Amerindian police on the Osage reservation. Turned in his star and rode west to California to join 2 brothers homesteading. Returned and turned to outlawry with Bob and Emmett, but was caught and given a 20 year sentence. Escaped and rejoined his siblings, and with them created the heaviest band of outlaws in Oklahoma memory for an eighteen month crime spree that would make them legends of the Old West. Robbed a railroad, but following the courtesy of their cousins, the Youngers, refused to rob its passengers. Good scouting by Bob’s fiance allowed them to strike with impunity. The final score of the Dalton gang was a raid on Coffeyville, Kansas to outdo their cousins and their failed Northfield, Minnesota raid on 2 banks at once. Recognized in the street, they were interrupted in the act, and had to flee down an alley, pursued at every corner by armed citizens. Shot and killed with a bullet in the chest. Inner: Blazing saddles lifetime of evincing a dualistic nature, with a draw towards being both a good guy and a bad guy, ultimately letting the latter prevail, as he continues to battle the two sides of his nature, without truly integrating himself.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS UNREPENTANT REBEL:
Storyline: The outrageously inimitable outlaw is given the freedom to act out his insouciant interior, for the disorderly sense of entertainment that lies at the heart of his ongoing search for the self-expressiveness of sheer masculinity.

Robert Mitchum (1917-1997) - American actor. Outer: Mother was a Norwegian immigrant who was a linotypist and writer for a Bridgeport paper. His father was of Scotch-Irish and Amerindian descent and was crushed in a Navy yard accident when he was 2. Had to be farmed out, and developed pellagra as a child. Showed early writing ability, but was far too alienated to discipline himself. Expelled from school for defecating in a teacher’s hat. Left home at 14, and had a highly adventurous nomadic youth, including 7 days on a Georgia chain-gang, before eventually riding the rails out to a sister’s house in Southern California. After leaving to work in a factory in Toledo, he returned to the Coast and worked as a dishwasher, busboy and stevedore. Married Dorothy Spence, a high school classmate in his early 20s, 2 sons from union, Jim and Chris, both became actors. The couple remained married until his death, although lived apart. 6’1”, heavy-lidded, well-built, with a sensual sexiness and a distinctive baritone. Worked the graveyard shift at Lockheed, and went temporarily blind until he quit. Sold shoes and began auditioning, making his debut at a community theater in “The Lower Depths.” Despite no formal training, he continued in local theater, then signed a contract to do westerns as a heavy in the Hopalong Cassidy series with United Artists, unconsciously joining and then following his past-life brother Frank (William Boyd), with whom he had been friends, in the role, reprising it seven times. Appeared in 18 films his first year in the movies, 1943. His big breakthrough came at WW II’s end, when he starred in The Story of G.I. Joe, and was drafted afterwards for his efforts, for an 8 month span. Re-entered civilian life as a bona fide star, whose rugged looks spoke a casual nonchalance that had great appeal to both men and women. Arrested for marijuana use in 1948, and spent almost 2 months in jail, but emerged more popular than ever. Heavy drinker and heavy smoker. American audiences easily forgave him his trespass and he went on to a long and memorable 5 decade career, with his roles as a vengeful ex-con in Cape Fear and as a preacher with love/hate tattooed on his hands in Night of the Hunter, his most unforgettable portrayals. Wrote and sang 2 albums of songs in the 1950s, while continuing on through the decades with his unique screen presence. In his 60s he did several TV miniseries, and kkept on working as a seasoned and effortless pro in films til the end of his life, although his longtime dissipations weakened him in his later years. Died of lung cancer and emphysema the same week as actor Jimmy Stewart, in a counterpoint of Hollywood light and darkness. Inner: Saw himself as a storyteller at heart. Casual to the point of excess. Fast, sardonic, self-deprecating wit. Never took acting seriously, yet had a preternatural skill at being natural. Devil-may-care lifetime of insouciance in the face of fame, while pursuing his own individualistic triple pathway of self-destruction, self-expression and self-realization. Bob Dalton (1867-1892) - American outlaw. Outer: Mother was a Sunday-school teacher, father was a drifter. Grew up on a farm, one of 15 children, and one of 4 who went bad, including Grat (Alan Ladd), Bill (Rory Calhoun) and Emmett (Nick Nolte), despite a clean-cut upbringing. Natural leader of the group. Became a U.S. marshal, after brother Frank (William Boyd) was killed in that post, but was fired for uncovering a gambling scam, later served with the Amerindian police on an Osage reservation. 5’10” and slender. Drifted south afterwards with brother Emmett to New Mexico, but, after being accused of cheating at faro, held up the game and headed to Oklahoma, with wanted posters on him. Teamed up with brothers Emmett and Grat for a train robbery in California, after a night of heavy drinking, but both the brothers were caught, and he jumped bail and escaped to Oklahoma. Formed a notorious gang there, with the avowed intention of outdoing the James gang, and was rejoined by his brothers, who had also skipped bail, and began robbing trains. As the leader, he felt within 12 months, they’d all have enough to retire on. His fiancee served as a scout for their robberies, allowing them to easily find cash-laden trains. She died, however, suddenly of cancer, just months before a raid he had been planning as their ultimate act, in a town where they had all briefly lived as small boys, Coffeyville, Kansas. The raid went awry when they were recognized on the street, and by the time they were in the bank, many of the town’s citizens were armed and waiting for them. Shot his way out to an alley, but, along with his brother Grat, was overwhelmed by a barrage of bullets and died. Their haul had been $21.98. Inner: Charismatic, charming, with a hell-raising bent for violent mischief. Guns blazing lifetime of shepherding his brothers through an assault on civilized society, only to be undone by an active, rather than a passive, audience to his antics.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS REFORMED REBEL:
Storyline: The easy rider adapts to his various realities with a seductive charm, showing himself to be the most expressive and least predictable of his crypto-siblings and their combined assault on the popular imagination.

Rory Calhoun (Francis McGown) (1922-1999) - American actor. Outer: Father was a professional gambler, who often beat his son. His parents divorced and his mother remarried a man named McGown, from whom he took his name. Grew up in poverty and ran away from home numerous times, gaining the nickname ‘Smoky,’ for his frequent disappearing acts. Stole a revolver at 13, then escaped from detention. Began hotwiring cars, and wound up in a federal reformatory in Oklahoma for 3 years.Finally left home for good at 17, hopping a freight to Los Angeles. 6’3”, handsome, lanky, outdoorsy and physical. Began hot-wiring cars, and wound up in a federal reformatory in Oklahoma for 3 years. After being reformed by a priest, he did physical work as a lumberjack, cowboy, net hauler and miner among other things, with a desire to become a forest ranger. A chance meeting on a bridle path with Alan Ladd, a hidden past-life brother of his, turned him in the direction of films, which he considered ‘sissy work.’ First labored under his real name, with little real progress, then after changing both studios and monikers, he began making a name for himself in action pictures, particularly westerns. His breakthrough film was Way of a Gaucho in 1952, which was filmed in Argentina. Married actress Lita Baron in his late 20s, divorced after 2 decades, 3 daughters from union. Often linked with Hollywood pin-ups, and settled one paternity suit. In their divorce proceedings, his wife accused him of adultery with 79 women. Later married Sue Boswell, an Australian journalist, one daughter, divorced after 6 years. Starred in the TV series, “The Texan,” and appeared on other programs as well, as a handsome hero. Successful entrepreneur, who owned several saloons, a hotel rug business in Beverly Hills and a huge ranch near Ojai. Also an amateur artist as well as a writer, penning “The Man From Padera” and “Cerrado.” Produced and directed, as well as scripted several films. In addition, he did stage work, and appeared on several TV anthology series. Although his career was largely spent in ‘B’ movies, he managed to make a name for himself through his ease and charm in front of the camera, while finding other creative outlets as well, so as not to sink into the self-destructive mode of his other former siblings, despite doing himself harm through lax health habits. Died of a combination of emphysema and diabetes. Inner: Multi-talented, macho, with a charm and an ease in all he did. Trick rider lifetime of raising his criminality into creativity, after being led by a past life brother into the realm of self-expression, even though that brother could not find peace with himself in it as well. Bill Dalton (1866-1894) - American criminal. Outer: Mother was a Sunday-school teacher, father was a drifter. Grew up on a farm, one of 15 children, and one of 4 who went astray of the law, including Bob (Robert Mitchum), Grat (Alan Ladd) and Emmett (Nick Nolte). 5’11”, solidly built. The boys were all initially clean-cut, and played instruments at local square dances, giving no indication of their ultimate destinies. Married and went out to California with another brother to homestead and then returned to begin a criminal career with his siblings. Caught on their first job in California, after a botched job from which they were hunted down, and he was sent to prison for 25 years. Later escaped confinement, returned, married and settled down to homesteading, but after the capture of Emmett and the killing of Grat and Bob in the failed Coffeyville raid, he took up their mantle, and continued his bank robbing career with gangs in Oklahoma. Shot in the back on his front porch by lawmen, while playing with his daughter. Inner: Rebel-with-a-pause lifetime of rebelling, reforming, and then rebelling once again, only to suffer the same fate as 3 of his 4 outlaw siblings.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS REFORMED REBEL:
Storyline: The rambunctious rider sees the errors of his wicked ways after first being compelled to experience them for therapeutic release, then settles into a more mature mode of self-expression, in order to try to transmute the true violent artist within him.

Nick Nolte (1940) - American actor. Outer: Father had been a 6’6” college football player, and became a traveling salesman, mother was a department store buyer. The duo eventually divorced. One older sister, who became an executive with the American Red Cross. Excellent athlete in all sports in high school, but not much of a student, despite a good innate intelligence, thanks to a rebellious nature which did not brook authority well, and also a drinking problem which began at 16. 6’1”, 210 lbs., blond-haired, solidly built. Got into Arizona State on a football scholarship, but was unable to keep up a semblance of grades, and wound up playing at 4 other schools, with the same pattern of losing himself in drink and drugs. Lived for a while in a whorehouse in Nogales, Mexico, and also spent considerable time communing on a commune. Married actress Sheila Page in 1966, divorced 5 years later. Worked briefly as an ironworker in Los Angeles, then got interested in dramatics after watching Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” and crossed the country for 14 years with various regional companies, as well as performing at Cafe La Mama in NYC, preferring to serve his apprenticeship in his selected craft away from the spotlight of mainstream venues. Came to more of a sense of peace with himself during this period, while attending classes at various schools, but was also convicted of counterfeiting draft cards, initially getting 45 years before being given 5 year’s probation during the Vietnam War. After returning to California in his early 30s, he began focusing more on his career and getting better roles, scoring his breakthrough as the TV co-star of “Rich Man, Poor Man,” and winning an Emmy for it in 1976. His small screen success then opened him up to noticeable film roles. Sued for palimony after living with Karen Ecklund for 7 years, then married Sharyn Haddad, a singer and dancer in 1978, divorced 5 years later. Married a 3rd time to Rebecca Linger in 1984, separated 6 years later, and finally divorced in 1997. Son Brawley from union became an actor. Had a big hit with 48 Hours and by his 40s, was an established star, combining toughness with intelligence in his action portrayals, which he enlarged to character and romantic leads. A longtime alcoholic with periodic breakdowns, he finally entered AA in 1989. Largely eschews the Hollywood treadmill for interesting, challenging parts, to which he brings his own penchant for telling detail and truth-saying. Particularly impressive as the son of violence in Affliction, as his talents and screen presence continue to grow and mature. Arrested for driving under the influence of drugs in 2002, which produced a particularly unflattering mugshot, as emblem of his ongoing battles with his creativity and self-annihilation. In 2007, at the age of 66, he had a daughter with his longtime partner, Clytie Lane. The following year, he leapt from his house and incurred minor injuries in escaping a fire which did major damage to his abode. In 2012, he was part of the cast of “Luck,” playing a horse trainer on a high profile cable series centered around Santa Anita racetrack, that focused on character studies rather than conventional storylines, only to see it suspended after three horses died during early production. Inner: Talented in a variety of fields, but naturally rebellious, taking his own good-time to integrate his abilities with his ambitions. Views life as inherently violent and theatrics as therapeutic. Researches every role carefully and compulsively. Disciplined worker, strong need for honesty and integrity, although also addiction-prone and extremely self-destructive, a Shiva figure constantly doing battle with his creativity and third rail draws. Mug shot lifetime of being given numerous gifts, and alternately squandering and utilizing them in a back-and-forth go-round dedicated to seeing whether he integrates or disintegrates around his talents. Emmett Dalton (1871-1937) - American criminal and actor. Outer: Mother was a Sunday-school teacher, father was a drifter. Parents were farmers, one of 15 children, and the youngest of 4 who wound up on the other side of the law, including Bob (Robert Mitchum), Bill (Rory Calhoun) and Grat (Alan Ladd). Had a meager education, 6’, solidly built. Like his siblings, he put on a badge after his older brother, Frank (William Boyd), a U.S. marshal, was shot and killed, and like them grew bored with the duty on an Osage reservation as part of their police force. Went south with his brother Bob, and after being accused of cheating in a faro game, robbed their fellow participants and fled. Went back to the family home, then teamed up with his side-winding siblings for several train robberies. In a raid on two Coffeyville, Kansas banks, where the brothers had spent part of their childhood, he saw Bob and Grat gunned down and was severely wounded and captured, because the citizens there had already been alerted to their intentions. Tried and sentenced to life imprisonment in the Kansas State Penitentiary when he was in his early 20s. Pardoned by the Kansas governor 14 years later, and returned home to marry his childhood sweetheart in 1907. Joined the Pawnee Bill Wild West Show, trading on his name, before ultimately moving to Los Angeles, where he became a successful real estate salesman and a completely reformed outlaw. Appeared in several films, beginning with The Last Stand of the Dalton Boys in 1912. Played himself in Beyond the Law, and went on the road with the movie, lecturing on the evils of outlawry. Wrote a saga on his family’s adventures, “When the Daltons Rode,” and near the end of his life, visited their graves in Coffeyville, with a sense of deep remorse for what he had once been. Inner: Passable actor with a genuine sense of passion about the Old West. Rehabilitative lifetime of violent mischief, before being given much time to think about his wayward ways and ultimately reforming, giving him the base to do so again, in his ongoing saga of rebelliousness, reform and recidivism.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER PLAYING WITH TRUE IDENTITY:
Storyline: The black-hatted good guy finds his name besmeared by other darker elements that wear it, and does his darnedest to prove himself a hopalong hero worthy of the accolades bestowed upon him.

William Boyd (1895-1972) - American actor. Outer: Father was a farm worker. The family moved to Oklahoma when he was a teen, and shortly afterwards, both died. Quit school and went to labor in the oil fields. Then worked his way west in an assortment of odd jobs, with the intention of a career in film. 5’11”, 180 lbs. Married Laura Maynard in 1917, divorced 4 years later. His first role came in his mid-20s as an extra in a Cecil B. DeMille comedy, and later he became a favorite of that director. Appeared as a handsome, rugged star of numerous silents in the 1920s, and gained a reputation as a playboy. Lived in high style up until 1931, when his contract was cancelled and he was forced to play villains in ‘B’ movies. Married and divorced actress Ruth Miller in his mid-20s, 1 son who died at 9 months. In his early 30s, he married and then divorced actress Elinore Faire after proposing to her on screen in The Volga Boatman in 1926. In 1929, he contracted his fourth marriage to actress Dorothy Sebastian, which also ended in divorce. In his mid-30s, a stage actor of the same name got into an alcohol and gambling scandal. Changed his own name to Bill Boyd to avoid confusion, but the taint remained subtly with him. Eventually changed his professional name back to William, when his notorious namesake died. Went through a period of heavy drinking himself, then, at 40, because he came cheap, he was chosen to star as Hopalong Cassidy in a series of westerns based on that fictional character, and it became his identifying role with the public. Played it on film, radio and later on TV, making a fortune out of his black-shirted, black-hatted non-drinking, non-smoking, non-cussing hero, while also setting a record for the most film performances in the same role - 66. With stability in his career, he married for good, to a 4th actress, and his fifth wife, Grace Bradley in his early 40s, and and the fifth time proved the charm, allowing him to settle into a role model lifestyle. Although a poor rider initially, he learned to be proficient on his horse, Topper. Took over as producer after 54 films, and ultimately brought the series onto TV, along with product tie-ins, doing quite handsomely in the process. Did 66 features and 52 half/hour TV shows. Retired in his mid-50s, and lived quietly the rest of his life, engaging in philanthropic pursuits. Died of Parkinson’s disease and heart failure. Inner: Credited his last wife with his long-lasting success. Prematurely gray, forever smiling. Easy-going, likable. Identity searching lifetime of confusion in names, much like his being linked with a family outlaw crew previously, in his ongoing attempt to act the model hero even when unfairly mired in the misdeeds of others through name association. Frank Dalton (1859-1887) - American marshal. Outer: Parents were farmers, one of 15 childrens, 4 of whom rode against the law, including Bob (Robert Mitchum), Bill (Rory Calhoun), Emmett (Nick Nolte) and Grat (Alan Ladd). Became a U.S. marshal in 1884, and served on a police force in Smith, Arkansas. Shot in the chest by outlaws, when he discovered them making illegal whiskey, then when his deputy rode off to get help, he was fatally dispatched with two bullets to the head. His brothers first picked up his badge, then went outlaw over his demise. Inner: White-hatted lifetime of being connected to fa amily of future outlaws, where his name would be sullied and made legendary by their acts, in an odd ongoing drama of being forced to clear his good name through exemplary behavior.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS EMINENTLY LIKABLE LAWMAN:
Storyline: The American dreamer plays that archetype in off-kilter manner on the silver screen, after having earlier acted it out directly, so as to pursue his own inherent dreams without his earlier violent conflicts to impede him.

Jeff Bridges (1949) - American actor. Outer: Father was actor Lloyd Bridges, mother was actress, poet and artist, Dorothy Simpson, who fostered creativity in her brood. The middle of 3 children, with older brother Beau also an actor, and a younger sister, Lucinda, a painter. Another brother, born two years before him, died of SIDS, which caused his mother to continually sleep by his side as an infant, touching him, although he was subsequently not scarred by her fear, growing into an extremely confident young boy, save for overreacting to his brother Beau’s public pointing at him, which he would do throughout his youth. Inaugurated his film career at 4 months as a crying baby in The Company She Keeps, and made his official acting debut at 8 on his father’s TV series, “Sea Hunt.” Also appeared as a child actor in other TV series. Developed a marijuana dependency in high school, but was able to kick it. His parents had earlier sent him to a military academy to help him shape up. Wrote songs as an adolescent, and performed with his brother, playing the guitar and singing, while the latter recited poetry. Moved to NYC to study acting at the Herbert Berghof Studio then served in the Coast Guard Reserve to avoid the draft, before making his adult film debut in 1970, with Halls of Anger. Established himself the following year in The Last Picture Show, as a high school football hero, and went on to a highly successful career of playing men at odds with themselves, in some 50 films, in contrast to his own seemingly integrated character. 6’2”, solidly built. n 1977, while on location in Montana, he met and married a local, Susan Geston, 3 daughters from the extremely union, which has been based on good, clear communication twixt the two. Able to assay both heroes and villains with equal ease, although his innate likability usually casts him in the former roles. Works in all genres, with a preference for solid stories and meaty characterizations. Most readily identified with the Dude, a laid back hippie and stoner in the 1998 release, The Big Lebowski, who runs completely counter to his own responsible character, although his speech is studded with similar slang. Enjoyed an emotional trifecta with a Golden Globe, Independent Spirit Award and Oscar in 2010 for Best Actor for Crazy Heart, a sober-up story of self-reclamation. Maintains homes in Southern California and Montana. Has written over 60 songs for his group the Abiders, and is also a painter and photographer, as well as an activist in select social causes. Inner: Affable charm, combining a likable masculinity with an offbeat sensibility. Has difficulty making choices. Carefully researches and rehearses all his work, despite his seemingly effortless ease in front of the camera. Meditates daily, and sees his wife as the string, allowing his own kite-self to soar. Bridges-building lifetime of putting most of his conflicts into reel life, rather than real life, and finding the creative outlet of acting as a perfect foil to the hidden violence of his past. Wyatt Earp (Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp) (1848-1929) - American lawman, gambler and entrepreneur. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish descent. Father Nicholas Earp (Stacy Keach, Sr.) was a Kentucky farmer who, in his restless life, had serially moved his family further and further out west, while holding a host of positions, including cooper, still operator, constable, land owner and soldier. The product of his sire’s second marriage, he was the third of five full brothers, including James (James Keach), Virgil (Beau Bridges), Morgan (Lloyd Bridges), and Warren (Stacy Keach), as well as a younger sister and an older half-brother. When he was two the family relocated to Iowa, where he grew up on a corn farm. Blonde-haired and well-built. Too young to fight in the Civil War, which has older two brothers and half-brother participated in, he left home as soon as he could to pursue work and adventure on the plains, as a stagecoach driver. Also may have been a pimp. Married Urilla Sutherland (Cillian Murphy) in Missouri in 1869, although his young wife died of typhus, which affected him deeply, making him dour and serious. Left the state owing money, and was involved in a horse-stealing incident. Worked as a buffalo hunter for a year, then gained a reputation by standing down a crew of Texas gunmen in Kansas in 1873, although the reality was he killed a rowdy who had been taking potshots at him. For the most part, he only used his gun to hit people over the head with it and drag them off to jail. Became a police officer in Wichita, the following year, and 2 years later joined Bat Masterson (Larry Hagman) in Dodge City, to lead a dualistic life of faro dealer and deputy, with a price on his head by outlaw barons, while taking a break in between to try the gold fields of South Dakota. His 2nd union to Mattie Blaylock (Blake Lively)) was common law, and his wife later killed herself, claiming he had ruined her life. Moved to Tombstone, Arizona in 1878, along with his brothers, initially with the idea of starting a freight-hauling business, although he wound up as a deputy of his brother Virgil there. His marriage ended when he was a deputy sheriff Tombstone, Arizona and he met Josephine ‘Sadie’ Marcus (Nina Hartley), a Jewish teenager would-be actress from San Francisco, who gave her inamorata of the time the boot, so that the duo could live together. Had a close long-lasting relationship with her, despite his occasional infidelities. May or may not have ultimately married, no children. On October 26, 1881, he and 2 brothers, along with ‘Doc’ Holliday (Woody Harrelson), shot it out for 3 minutes, with the Clanton gang, exchanging some 30-50 shots, near the O.K. Corral, to enter western legend. Both his brothers were wounded, and one Clanton and another set of brothers died in the wake of the half minute of gunfire. Almost lynched afterwards, then tried for murder and acquitted, but the town’s black hats continued to challenge the Earps’s authority. After his brother Morgan was shot in 1882, he, along with others, tracked down the killers and slew 4 of them, but he forfeited his lawman’s badge in the process. Began prospecting with his wife in 1882, traveling from Alaska to Mexico to Idaho, with their pets in tow. Pursued and shot at by his earlier enemies during this stretch. Became a business man, boxing promoter and boxing referee, making a controversial call in the 1896 heavyweight bout between Bob Fitzsimmons (Lee Marvin) and Tom Sharkey (Charles Barkley), in favor of the latter, whom he had bet on, and was never allowed to referee again. Continued his love for high stakes poker, enjoyed living well and hanging with the fast, moneyed set. Ultimately summered in Los Angeles and pursued his mining claims east of there in the winter. Owned 3 gambling dens in the red-light district of San Diego, and was nabbed for running a bunco game in Los Angeles in 1911. Dabbled in real estate, and occasionally gave advice for western screenwriters, although felt the screen cowboy stars were “damned fool dudes.” Became a fixed legend when a fictionalized bestseller about his life was serialized in the Saturday Evening Post, shortly after his peaceful death, in his wife’s arms. Inner: Dualistic, a materialist and dreamer, with a need to be on the edge to give his life more validity. Courageous, with a strong sense of law’n’order, and a fanatic desire to right wrongs. Gambler-at-heart lifetime of playing with life’n’death, before trying to live out the American dream of high-style self-re-creation.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SELF-PRESERVER:
Storyline: The easy-going submariner opts for saving his own professional skin, trading off a witch hunt for a sea hunt, after earlier having made himself vulnerable to his family’s propensity for attracting violence.

Lloyd Bridges (1913-1988) - American actor. Outer: Father owned a theater along with other businesses, making his son a lifelong film buff. Given a trophy by Pres. William Taft (Bill Clinton) as America’s fattest baby. Took a drama class in high school, then went to UCLA, where he was a 3 sport athlete, and majored in political science, while taking legal courses, per his father’s wish that he be a lawyer. 6’2”, 190 lbs. President of the drama society at school, which was where his real interest lay. Began appearing in stock, before making his Broadway debut in 1937 in a modern-dress version of “Othello.” In 1939, he married actress Dorothy Simpson, 3 children, including actors Beau and Jeff Bridges, as well as one son who died from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Founded the Playroom Club to stage modern off-Broadway plays, then taught drama at a private school in Connecticut. Began his motion picture career in 1941 in low-budget films for Columbia, commencing with The Lone Wolf Takes a Chance. Appeared frequently in westerns, thanks to his tall, rugged looks, sometimes playing heroes and sometimes heavies. After 1945, when he left Columbia, his roles improved, most noticeably as the save-your-own-hide deputy sheriff in High Noon. Appeared as a key witness in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee in the early 1950, after being linked with the Actor’s Lab, which was supposedly communist-infiltrated, and saved his own career by cooperating. Later cleared by the FBI. Starred in TV’s “Seahunt,” as skindiver Mike Nelson, between 1957 and 1961 then appeared in several other series over the next 2 decades, including his own show in ‘62-’63, although they never achieved the popularity of his first one. Active in socially liberal causes. Continued working in character roles in made-for-TV films, while also appearing several times with his son Jeff. Died of natural causes. Inner: Easy charm, socially aware. Compromised lifetime of saving his own skin, after being the victim of his family’s violence in an earlier go-round, acting out his reel life “High Noon,” role in real life. Morgan Earp (1851-1882) - American lawman. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish descent. Father Nicholas Earp (Stacy Keach, Sr.) was a Kentucky farmer, as well as a constable, bootlegger, soldier and cooper, who moved his family steadily westward, settling in Iowa, where his youngest children grew up, and where he was born. The product of his sire’s second marriage, with one older half-brother Newton from the first. 5th of the second crew of 8, with two sisters who died young, and one who outlived the entire family. HIs full brothers were, in order, James (James Keach), Virgil (Beau Bridges), Wyatt (Jeff Bridges) and Warren (Stacy Keach). Too young to fight in the Civil War, as his two older and one-half brother did, he stayed with the family as it eventually made its way out to southern California. Left home, and followed the family tradition of law enforcement, becoming a marshal in Butte, Montana, then the sheriff of Ford County, Kansas. Joined his 2 brothers in Tombstone, Arizona, as a deputy sheriff and was wounded in the infamous Gunfight at the OK Corral against the Clanton gang in 1881. Shot in the shoulder, he was bedridden afterwards, and unlike his brother Wyatt, escaped prosecution for his part, although he lost his deputy badge. Recovered and was gunned down in the back by the Clanton gang, while shooting pool in a saloon, and died in Wyatt’s arms. Two of his siblings would then go on to avenge his death, in what would become known as the Earp Vendetta Ride, adding ever more fodder to his family’s memorable legacy. Inner: Most easy-going of the Earp troupe. Younger son lifetime of paying the piper for his family’s violence, which probably gave him the need to be far more self-protective the next time around in this series.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS SECONDARY SIBLING:
Storyline: The older brother plays a secondary role to his more charismatic sibling, while dealing with issues of his physicality, within the context of a physical, expressive family.

Beau Bridges (1941) - American actor. Outer: Oldest of 3 surviving children of actor Lloyd Bridges and actress Dorothy Simpson. Brother of Jeff Bridges. Appeared in some films as a child, beginning in 1948, with Force of Evil. Used to torment his sibling by pointing at him for hours at public places, or doing it at home under the table, since he knew he could always get an exaggerated reaction from his subtly bullying. Went to UCLA and then the Univ. of Hawai’i, with the intent of becoming a professional basketball player, but his height, 5’9”, precluded that career. Began performing with his brother Jeff, reading poetry while the latter sang and played guitar. Also used to stage fake fights with his brother Jeff in supermarkets as a means of audience-testing, and then quickly leave before the police came. Appeared in experimental off-Broadway pieces, as a way of learning his chosen craft, while also co-starring at 19 in a TV weekday science fiction serial. Returned to films in his early 20s, and by the end of the decade, had established himself in both comedy and drama as an all-American leading man with a slightly off-beat personality, although his career would be the least noted of the 3 acting Bridges, despite appearing in nearly 100 films and TV movies. Married Julie Landifield in 1964, 2 sons from the union, including Jordan who became an actor, appearing with him on stage in 2001 in “Looking for Normal.” Tried directing in the 1980s, with 2 films in which he starred, and has gradually broadened his skills, to become a successful character actor. After divorcing in 1984, he married Wendy Treece, two sons and a daughter from the second union. Inner: Easy-going, warm and family-oriented. Beau geste lifetime of coming into a high profile acting family, and trying to assert his talents in other arenas, before accepting his legacy and proving himself able to learn and expand within a secondary choice. Virgil Earp (1843-1905) - American lawman. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish descent. Father Nicholas Earp (Stacy Keach, Sr.) was a Kentucky farmer, who had checkered career as a cooper, bootlegger and judge, as well. The product of his sire’s second marriage, he was the second oldest brother of the second brood, which included James (James Keach), Wyatt (Jeff Bridges), Morgan (Lloyd Bridges), and Warren (Stacy Keach), as well as a younger sister Adelia, who would outlive the entire family. Along with his older half-brother and James, he went off to fight in the Civil War on the Union side, lasting the entire fray. Drove a stagecoach afterwards, before joining the Dodge City police force. Moved to Arizona in 1876, where he married, prospected and farmed, and was joined by three of his brothers, James, Morgan and Wyatt. Became a deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona, and was such a stickler for law and order, he once arrested Wyatt for disturbing the peace, when he joined him there. Maintained an unpopular gun control law in the city, and was involved, along with them, in the infamous Gunfight at the OK Corral in 1881 against the Clanton gang. Shot in the leg, he was bedridden for several months, during which time he was discharged as a deputy marshal. Later that year, he was peppered with buckshot in the side, by a member of the Clanton gang while entering a saloon and wound up a cripple for life. Later prospected with his wife, and was also city marshal of Colton, California. Died of pneumonia while prospecting. Inner: Very connected to his family, as were all his siblings, in an extremely loyal brood to one another. Hobbled lifetime of carrying the wounds for his family, along with another crippled brother, and dealing with life as an action-oriented figure in a deactivated body

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS CHAMELEONIC GENDER-CHANGER:
Storyline: The iridescent Irishman shows a continued affinity for the same name rhythm, while continually expanding his ability to be anyone he needs to be in his public life by maintaining his longtime constancy in his private affairs.

Cillian Murphy (1976) - Irish actor. Outer: From a family of educators. Father worked for the Irish Dept. of Education as a school inspector, while his mother was a French teacher. Raised in a Roman Catholic household, he was the oldest of four, with a brother and two sisters. Began writing songs at 10, and launched his initial performing career as a rock musician. Went to a Catholic school, where his rebellious nature got him in trouble with the authorities, although he found being on stage in school productions exhilarating. 5’9”, with blue eyes. Played guitar and sang in several bands, alongside his brother Padraig, in a Frank Zappa inspired band, before turning down a record deal, and looking for some other sort of venue for his talents. His brother, in turn, became a design engineer. Studied law for a year at University College Cork, although failed his exams, since he had little interest in pursuing the profession. Appeared in an amateur production at the college, and made his professional acting debut on stage in 1996 in “Disco Pigs,” which wound up touring Europe, Canada and Australia for two years. Dropped his rock star ambitions, got an agent, and began doing indies, as well as shorts, while moving to Dublin and then London in 2001. Had an initial breakthrough performance in the post-apocalyptic drama 28 Days Later, then went on to supports in several Hollywood features, including two noted high profile villain turns in Red Eye and Batman Begins. In between he toured Ireland in John Synge’s (Jeff Buckley), “Playboy of the Western World.” Extremely chameleonic, he has easily slipped into a host of divergent roles, winning plaudits and awards for his various performances on both the stage and screen. Married artist and longtime live-in girlfriend, Yvonne McGuiness in 2004, two sons from the union. Ultimately became an atheist, and remains politically active in his native Ireland. Finally appeared on a TV talk show in 2010, after showing an extreme reluctance to talk about anything but his work in previous interviews. Inner: Completely uninterested in the trappings of stardom, while always looking for quality in the films he selects. Family and close-knit friends from Ireland are his mainstay, while music continues to be an integral part of his life. Gender-changing lifetime of exploring his chameleonic gifts on stage and screen from a male perspective, using a strong and consistent grounding in his personal life to give him the freedom to do so. Billie Burke (Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke) (1884-1970) - American actress. Outer: Father was a well-known circus clown. Toured with him as a child in both the U.S. and Europe, before her family ultimately settled in London. Decided to become an actress after seeing plays in the city’s West End. 5’3”, with red-hair. Made her stage debut at 18, and four years later, came to NYC, where she also appeared on Broadway, and met and married producer Flo Ziegfeld (Bob Evans) in 1914, one daughter from the union, which lasted until his death in 1932. Never married again afterwards. Made her film debut in 1916 in Peggy, playing the title role, and continued alternating between stage and screen during the early silent era, with almost all her films shot in NYC. Temporarily retired during the 1920s, until the 1929 stock market crash wiped out her husband’s fortune. Lost him in 1932, and the same year, she filmed the comedy Dinner at Eight, in which she assayed a character, a high-voiced featherbrain, that would pigeonhole her in fine conservative Hollywood tradition for the rest of her career. The singular notable exception would be her most remembered role, Glinda, the Good Witch in The Wizard of Oz, in 1939. Costarred in the “Topper” series, and was busy throughout the 1940s, but by the early 1950s, her career hit pretty much of a standstill, with her film credits ending in 1960, at which time, she retired. Made plaint at the end that acting was no longer fun, due to memory loss. Died of natural causes. Inner: Outgoing, good-natured, kindhearted and optimistic Always felt herself to be an artiste, with something to offer the world. Flibbertigibbet lifetime of attaching herself once more to a man of great magnetism and power in her ongoing need to absorb similar attributes to herself in her desire to become a transcendent performer as well as a constant partner. Urilla Earp (Urilla Sutherland) (1849-1870) - American frontier spouse. Outer: Family migrated from Illinois to Missouri, where her parents operated the Lamar House Hotel. Knew Wyatt Earp (Jeff Bridges) as a child and in 1870, she married him in a ceremony conducted by his father, Nicholas (Stacy Keach, Sr.) at the very beginning of his career, when he was appointed town constable. May have either died of typhus or in childbirth shortly afterwards, in the home her husband had recently bought and quickly sold following her death, while caused him to plunge into a period of deep depression, and marked his character as serious ever after. Like his other two wives, there would be a curious repetition of syllables in all her names in this series. Inner: Support lifetime of serving as a catalyst for a seminal western figure to question the very roots of his beliefs, before returning, like him and his family, into the far more creative realm of thespian self-expression.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS WILD WOMAN:
Storyline: The arch adventuress uninhibitedly pursues her passions without worrying about what other people think, as a beacon for free-swinging womanhood and its liberation from imposed social constraints.

vNina Hartley (Marie Louise Hartman) (1959) - American porn star and sex educator. Outer: From a socialist Jewish family, both her grandfather, a physics professor, and father, a radio announcer, were Communist Party members. Her maternal grandfather was one of the lawyers who defended the Scottsboro boys in Alabama in 1931, when they were literally railroaded in an infamous rape case, while her mother was also a Communist. Her own political orientation would eventually veer towards utopian socialist. Had two brothers, as well as a sister, who became a doctor, although her relations with one brother and her sister would become strained because of her enthusiastic notoriety, and their embracing of Orthodox Judaism. Grew up in a liberal environment and a secular household. Both parents got into Zen Buddhism when she was ten, and it has been a practice of hers as well, although she never adhered to the specifics of any religion. Shy and cerebral in high school, she was largely a recluse, and ill-at-ease in social situations. Went to San Francisco State’s nursing school, and graduated magna cum laude in 1985, as a registered nurse. Blonde, blue-eyed, 5’4’, 130 lbs. During her schooling, she began working as a stripper at the notorious Mitchell Brothers O’Farrell theater in San Francisco, which led to pornographic films in 1984, in which she made her debut in Educating Nina. The movie was a huge hit and launched her career, which amounted to over 700 films, as one of the long-standing mainstays of the industry, with a willingness to enthusiastically explore all aspects of her sexuality on film. Has also appeared in a few mainstream films, including Boogie Nights, a 1990s look at the San Fernando Valley porn scene in the 1970s. Chose her surname from actress Mariette Hartley, while her first name was picked because it was easy to pronounce. Married in 1983, and bisexual, she lived in a swinging threesome for twenty years with two liberal Methodists, who had known each other beforehand, before divorcing and marrying Ernest Greene, an adult film director, in 2003. A top star in the late 1980s, before turning to producing in the 1990s, when her career flatlined, before resurrecting it as a teacher. Became an outspoken advocate of freedom of sexual expression for women, as well as a promoter of the adult film industry. Arrested in 1993 for publicly performing at an adult video industry fundraiser, she eventually pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor. As a sex educator, she has produced, directed and starred in a “Guide to...” series, which covers the gamut of sexual instruction, from foreplay to specific practices, and has also employed the internet as a self-promotion tool. Still performing into her late 40s, in niche mature roles, she remains an unabashed enthusiast for priapic self-expression. Inner: Fiercely feminist, strongly opinionated, and well-liked by all who know her. Linga yoni lifetime of attempting to integrate her cerebrality and sensuality in most public manner, in order to try to help a largely repressed society move past its longtime confused sense of eros. vJosephine Earp (Josephine Sarah Marcus) (c1861-1944) - American dancer and writer. Known as Sadie. Outer: From a middle-class merchant family. Both parents were Jewish immigrants from Prussia. The middle of three with an older and younger sister. When she was around nine, the family moved to San Francisco. Loved to go to the theater there, and after seeing Gilbert & Sullivan’s “H.M.S. Pinafore”, had her heart set on becoming an actress. Full-fleshed, with a small trim figure. With a pair of friends, she ran off and joined a traveling G & S troupe, as a dancer. Traveled the California and Arizona circuit with it, and while in the Arizona territory, she met Johnny Behan, a sheriff’s deputy, and became his mistress. While in Tombstone in 1881, he introduced her to local lawman Wyatt Earp (Jeff Bridges), and they soon became an item, as both shed their partners for each other. Sang and danced at the Birdcage Saloon, and also worked as a prostitute, until the infamous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral at the end of the year, which turned Earp into a vengeance seeker over his brother Morgan’s (Mike Bridges) subsequent death afterwards. Returned to San Francisco to wait for him, and in 1882 he came for her. Although no record exists of their officially getting married, they were partners-for-life at that point, despite often being at odds with one another, because of their strong personalities. No children from the union. Traveled throughout the West, from Idaho all the way down to Mexico and as far up as Alaska with him, working in saloons, while he both gambled and mined. His prospecting in Alaska brought them $80,000, which finally allowed them to settle near Los Angeles after the turn of the century, where they summered, as he continued gambling, and pursuing his dream of striking it rich with his various mining claims. Although he was occasionally unfaithful, they were largely inseparable, and she reveled in his growing legend. The duo hung with the fast moneyed set, including Hollywoodians, and she enjoyed a highly social and happy existence with him, traveling constantly, with their various pets in tow. When he finally died in her arms in 1929, she was so distraught, she could not even attend his funeral. Decided afterwards to set the record straight on her legendary partner, and for the next 15 years continued her peripatetic ways, while working on her memoirs, which became known as the Cason Manuscript. Her end-life was largely a downward spiral filled with depression and ill health. Never saw her story in print, although it was later published under the name “I Married Wyatt Earp,” by another author, who was dismissed as a fraud. Buried alongside Earp, under the same tombstone. Inner: Highly adventurous, loved taking chances, and being constantly on the move, with little sense of domesticity about her. Peripatetic lifetime of teaming up with a legend, and riding it for all it was worth, save for its final sunset, which probably inspired her to lead a somewhat more independently codependent existence the next time around.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ONGOING PATERFAMILIAS:
Storyline: The foursquare father provides solid foundations for his rambunctious sons to outstrip him in fame and fortune, while giving them a loving and loyal familial sense, as both teacher and exemplar.

Stacy Keach, Sr. (Walter Stacy Keach, Sr.) (1914-2003) - American actor, director and drama coach. Outer: Went to Northwestern Univ., where he got a BA and Master’s degree in Drama, while also serving as a Dramatic Arts instructor while he was a graduate student. Married in 1937 to Mary Cain Peckham, an actress, two sons from the union, Stacy Keach, Jr. and James Keach, both of whom pursued successful acting careers. Close family. Taught at Armstrong Junior College, and while in Georgia, founded the Savannah Playhouse, before heading out to Hollywood, to work as an actor/director for the Pasadena Playhouse. Began his film career in the early 1940s, largely in ‘B’ fare, while also serving as a dialogue coach for Universal Studios, as well as a contract actor. After 5 years there, he switched to RKO as a producer, where he created, produced and directed “Tales of the Texas Rangers,” on radio for two years in the early 1950s, which then made a successful transition to TV. In addition to his other work, he also founded Kayden Records, an award-winning education company, and was an early developer of industrial films. Appeared in a number of TV series, mostly westerns, as well as his son James’s “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,” late in his career. An active Rotarian, he was also a member of the Pacific Pioneer Broadcasters. Wound up as a fairly ubiquitous presence on the small and large screen, making some 30 films and a hundred TV appearances in what would be over half a century career. Died of congestive heart failure, and his wife exited after him later that year. Inner: Well-liked, highly social and an effective teacher. Never a big name, but always a reliable support, while giving strong support to his sons in their ambitions. Second act lifetime of switching milieus from the soil to screens both large and small and once again providing his progeny with the ballast to surpass him in fame, although not in strength of character. Nicholas Earp (1813-1907) - American farmer, constable, bootlegger and pioneer. Outer: 3rd of 10 children of a lawyer and Methodist-Episcopal preacher. When he was young, the family moved from Virginia to Kentucky, where he grew up. Originally studied law, but preferred farming, and became a successful planter. Did some soldiering, including the Mexican-American War, as a sate for his ongoing sense of adventure, although his real love was always the soil. In 1836, he married Abigail Storm, one son Newton from the union, as well as a daughter, although both his wife and daughter serially died in 1839. The following year, he married a second time to Virginia Cooksey, a fellow Kentuckian, 8 children from the lasting union, James (James Keach), Virgil (Beau Bridges), a daughter who died before she reached her teens, Wyatt (Jeff Bridges), his most famous son, Morgan (Lloyd Bridges), Warren (Stacy Keach), a short-lived daughter, and Adelia, the longest-lived of the whole family. Settled on an 80 acre farm in Iowa where he grew corn, before moving to Illinois, where he became a constable, after finding no other suitable work, while running an illegal still on the side, so as to be on both sides of the law, as well as the wrong side of the local women’s temperance union. In 1859, he was convicted of bootlegging, and was unable to pay the fine, causing him to lose his farm, and forcing him to move back to Iowa. Also faced charges of tax evasion and failing to pay his debts. Despite his southern root, he was a Lincoln Republican, and during the Civil War, he served as a provost marshal for recruitment, sending his three eldest songs off to battle, despite having mixed feelings about fighting against the traditions in which he was raised. Finally decided to go beyond the divisions of North and South, and in 1864, he bundled the rest of his family in a conestoga, and joined a train of saidsame heading to California as a wagon-master. Settled in the lush central valleys of southern California on a produce farm, with his youngest children still living at home. Extremely restless, he moved the family to Missouri in 1868, where he became a constable again, before resigning to serve as a justice of the peace. His son Wyatt replaced him in the former position, and his brothers Virgil and Morgan followed suit. During the 1870s, he moved back to California, settling again in the southern part of the state, to become a farmer once more. His house always served as a welcoming roost for his sons and their spouses, in their own peripatetic adventurous lives. Active in civic affairs, he became one of the founders of a local pioneer society. In 1893, his second wife died, and he married Annie Cadd, an English-born widow soon afterwards. Ended his long career by being elected to the Los Angeles county court, before dying in an old soldier’s home. Inner: Highly domestic, albeit extremely restless, with an ambiguous view of the law and a great love of growing things. Loving father, whose home was always open to his children, long after they had left it. Paterfamilias lifetime of serving as a role model for his famous progeny, as a borderline lawman and devoted family man, always looking over the horizon for his next roosting place.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS INIMITABLE ASSAYER OF SINGULAR ROLES;
Storyline: The harelipped antihero stays with his longtime karmic family, and along with them, switches over to the stage, carving out a unique career of both tough guy and bard interpreter, with a touch of his crypto-outlaw past creeping through his performances, and upon occasion, his life.

Stacy Keach (Walter Stacy Keach, Jr.) (1941) - American actor. Outer: Father was an actor/director/producer of the same name, who was teaching drama at Armstrong Junior College in Georgia at the time of his birth. Mother, Mary Cain Peckham, was an actress prior to the marriage. On the night he was born, lightning struck the chimney of their house, and it caught fire, giving indication of the special son to come. Older brother of actor James Keach. Born with a cleft palate and harelip, he underwent four operations as a child to try correct it. When he was one, his parents headed out west to take advantage of the film industry, and he grew up in the San Fernando Valley, before going to college at Berkeley, where he earned B.A.s in both English and Dramatic Arts. Told his harelip would prevent him from ever becoming a leading man, he ignored the bad advice, and eagerly pursued his progenitor’s profession. 6’, with a strongly masculine cast. Married Marilyn Aiken in 1964, later divorced. Cut his dramatic teeth at various Shakespearean festivals, and made his Broadway debut in 1965. Went on to get his M.F.A. at the Yale School of Drama, and then was a Fulbright Scholar at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Began his career in theater, and made his first notable Broadway appearance as Buffalo Bill Cody (Clint Eastwood) in “Indians.” Went on to appear in both avant-garde and classical works, winning a variety of awards for his efforts, including a trio of Obies, with the first in 1969 for “MacBird,” the second in 1971 for the alcoholic son in Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey into Night,” and his third for “Hamlet,” in 1973, as well as a Golden Globe Best Actor Award in 1989 for playing writer Ernest Hemingway in a made-for-TV movie. Made his film debut in 1968 in a support role in The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, then took on a host of eccentric roles in the early 1970s, doing both comedy and drama. Never able to translate his early work into movie superstardom, largely because of his eclectic choice of vehicles. Took a cavalier attitude towards his career, deliberately playing completely off-the-wall characters in seldom-seen films, for the challenges they offered him as a wide-ranging actor. Married a second time in 1975, later divorced. Played along with his brother James in The Long Riders, which the former co-wrote and co-produced, as a crypto-reprisal for several of the actors involved of their earlier outlaw days in the old West, with the Carradine brothers directly repeating their previous go-round as the Younger brothers. In 1981, he married model Jill Donahue, divorced five years laterdivorced five years later. Decided at some point to do meat’n’potatoes TV work, and spent four seasons in the 1980s doing pulp detective Mike Hammer on a series of that name. In an act of rebellion against the straitjacketing role, he was busted for cocaine possession at Heathrow Airport in London, and spent half a year in prison, although a decade later reprised the same role in a syndicated series of the same name. Used his down time in prison to further his understanding of a repeat character of a warden he would subsequently play in “Prison Break.” Acted appropriately contrite after the incident, and was allowed to continue playing the hard-boiled Hammer. Married a fourth time in the mid-1980s to Polish model and actress Malgosia Tomassi, daughter and son from the union. By the end of the decade, he decided to concentrate on TV work in lieu of films, and appeared in several series, always to memorable effect. In addition to his various roles, he has served as a narrator in a number of TV series. Active in charity work as well as a member of various artistic councils and boards, he remains a unique figure on both the large and small screen, as a craftsman and personality who always does standout work. Inner: Strong aesthetic sensibilities, with a fearless sense of craft. Lightning struck lifetime of continuing with his longtime family members in their ongoing pursuits, while harnessing an innate anger into creative expression, as a means of actively transforming himself from his far darker self in the previous go-round in this series into a figure of delight and constant surprise in his performances. Warren Earp (Baxter Warren Earp) (1855-1900) - American. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish descent. Father Nicholas Earp (Stacy Keach, Sr.) was a restless Kentuckian with Union sympathies who pursued a variety of occupations: soldier, farmer, cooper, constable, moonshiner and justice. Youngest of the five Earp brothers of his sire’s second family, including James (James Keach), Virgil (Beau Bridges), Wyatt (Jeff Bridges), and Morgan (Lloyd Bridges). Also had one older half-brother, Newton, from his father’s first marriage, as well as one surviving younger sister, Adelia. Too young to take part in the Civil War as his three oldest brothers had, he spent his youth in unrecorded manner, serially moving out further and further west with his family, then followed his siblings’ example and became a frontier lawman. Came out to Tombstone, Arizona in 1880, and worked as a deputy for Virgil, although missed out on the infamous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, by being at his parent’s home in California at the time. Took part in Wyatt’s subsequent Vendetta Ride in seeking vengeance on the murder of Morgan. Indicted for his part, but was never convicted. Pursued a restless and peripheral existence afterwards, including mail stage driver and range detective, while garnering the reputation of being a bully as he got older, by taking advantage of the legendary status of his sibling Wyatt. As such, he got into a drunken argument in a bar one night. Even though he deliberately disarmed himself, his adversary, fearing the Earp name, shot him in the chest, and he died instantly, an ironic victim of the very family reputation he had so often exploited. Although his brother Virgil later came to town to investigate his death, he did not seek revenge, nor did his surviving brothers, and he wound up as a footnote to the family legend. Inner: Angry, pugnacious, and probably frustrated over his failure to match his famous siblings in their derring and do. Ignominious lifetime of being part of a legendary family, only to suffer an inglorious end because of their reputation, rather than his own.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ONGOING SUPPORT TO MORE FAMOUS CLOSE COHORTS:
Storyline: The secondary sibling carves out his own quieter careers for himself, satisfied with being a lesser light to both his partner and his ongoing family.

James Keach (1947) - American actor, director and producer. Outer: Father was character actor, teacher and director Stacy Keach, Sr. Mother, Mary Cain Peckham, was an actress prior to the marriage. Younger brother of actor Stacy Keach, Jr. The family moved out to southern California when he was young, where he grew up. Went to Northwestern Univ., as his father had, and then followed his sibling to the Yale School of Drama, where he, too, got an M.F.A. Married actress Holly Collins, the sister of folkie Judy Collins, with whom his brother was involved at the time. One son from the union, Kalen, who would follow his father’s profession. A classically trained actor, capable of Shakespeare and pop fare, he began his career in TV, often playing villains, in what would prove to be a two decade career in front of the camera, beginning in 1971. Like his sibling, he got his initial acting chops at the NY Shakespeare festival, then made his small screen debut as flyboy Orville Wright in a PBS biography in 1972. Three years later, he made his big screen debut in Sunburst, in a support role. In 1980, he appeared along with his sibling in The Long Riders, a reprise for several of the cast members, of their real life roles in the Old West, with the Carradine brothers, directly reprising themselves as outlaw Younger brothers. Co-wrote and co-executive produced the film, as a crypto-paean to his own hidden past. Continued as a secondary support and heavy throughout the decade, before steadily slipping behind the camera. Married a second time to actress Mimi Maynard, divorced in 1993. Began directing TV shows, then made his film directorial debut with False Identity in 1990, which starred his brother. Met English actress Jane Seymour while directing Sunstroke in 1993, another vehicle on which he was co-executive producer, and the two were married soon afterwards. Twin sons from the union. Has had a far lower key career than his high profile brother, ultimately finding his true metier behind the scenes, as director and producer, including his wife’s biggest American TV hit, “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman,” which would also employ his father. Caught cheating on his spouse, who promptly gave him the boot in 2012, in preparation for divorcing him, after two decades of marriage. Inner: Youngest, rather than oldest, in his ongoing family, as he had been before, although once again quite content to pursue a lower profile career, geared towards highlighting the talents of those closest to him. Support role lifetime, once again, of taking secondary status to those around him, while providing the proper ballast to bring out the best in them. James Earp (1841-1926) - American farmer and constable. Outer: Of Scotch-Irish descent. Father Nicholas (Stacy Keach, Sr.) was a restless former Kentuckian and Lincoln Republican, who pursued a variety of occupations, including soldier, farmer, barrelmaker, bootlegger, constable and judge. Oldest of the eight children of his sire’s second marriage, including Virgil (Beau Bridges), Wyatt (Jeff Bridges), Morgan (Lloyd Bridges), and Warren (Stacy Keach), as well as a sister, Adelia, who outlived the rest of the family. Had one older half-brother, Newton, as well. Along with Newton and Virgil, he enlisted in the Union Army at the outbreak of the Civil War, although was badly wounded early on and mustered out. Like his father and siblings, he evinced the same kind of restlessness, moving frequently around the west, before marrying a former prostitute, Nellie Kechum in 1873. Worked as a deputy marshal in Dodge City, then followed his brothers to Tombstone, Arizona, in 1879. While his siblings continued their law enforcement careers, he opted to work as a saloonkeeper and gambling house manager. Did not take part in the infamous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in 1881, despite being in town at the time. After the murder of his brother Virgil, he moved to Colton, California, where his parents lived, and did not participate in the subsequent Earp Vendetta Ride, in which Wyatt and Warren and others extracted vengeance for their sibling’s death. Settled permanently in California in 1890, and lived peacefully and quietly there, the least violent male member of his family. Ultimately died with his boots off, of natural causes. Inner: Probably had the fight taken out of him with his serious war wound, and wound up with less of a need to engage in the gunplay of his siblings. Support role lifetime of being part of a legendary family, without involving himself in its larger dramas or vendettas, thanks to getting his fill, early on, of the repercussions of violent action.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LEGENDARY BAD BOY:
Storyline: The American icon finally grows up after many an adolescent go-round as a preternatural rebel, and makes the transition from destruction to creation, without losing his basic feisty sensibilities.

Sean Penn (1960) - American actor. Outer: Father was TV and film writer/director Leo Penn, mother was TV actress Eileen Ryan. The duo married after appearing together on stage in Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh,” in NYC. His younger brother Chris also became an actor, while his other sibling Michael became a musician. Grew up in a theatrical household in California geared towards raising actors, so there was little conflict in his choice of profession. Close with parents, and always sensitive to the underdog, feeling somewhat embarrassed at his own good fortune, although he came to see his sire as a “weekend” father, giving his wife far more attention than his kids, which contributed to his own eventual attention-getting antics. His sire was blacklisted during the 1950s, after refusing to name names during Hollywood’s conscience-wrestling with the House of Un-American Activities over its earlier flirtation with Communism, and had to work under a pseudonym, making his son quite politically aware, including an obsessive interest in the Richard Nixon Watergate scandal. Originally wanted to be an attorney. After high school, he became an apprentice for two years at the Group Repertory Theater in Los Angeles, where he got a thorough education in his craft. 5’9”. Made his professional debut on TV in an episode of “Barnaby Jones,” in his late teens, and in his early 20s, made his film debut in Taps. Drew considerable attention as a spaced-out surfer in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, then established himself as one of Hollywood’s bad boys, with a pugnacious attitude and a propensity for brawling. Married singer Madonna in 1985 just as her career was taking off, which made him even more bellicose, particularly at all the press attention the couple garnered. The duo made one ill-received film together, Shanghai Surprise, and to no surprise, the rocky marriage officially ended 4 years after it began, although the 2 remained loosely connected. In the interim, he did 32 days in jail for assaulting an extra. Made his debut as a director with The Indian Runner in his early 30s, while prematurely announcing his retirement from appearing in front of the camera. Returned to the screen, however, as a much more mature and complete actor, with the continued ability to transcend his material, and a great desire to play characters who are torn by utter despair. Eventually married actress Robin Wright after a longtime on-and-off liaison, 2 children from union, including a son Hopper Jack, named after Dennis Hopper and Jack Nicholson. Directed his parents on stage in LA in his late 30s, just before his father’s death, showing more and more of a preference for being behind the scenes as he gets older, despite an extremely charged and talented presence on celluloid, with the ability to get deep into each of his characters. A four pack a day cigarette smoker, he made an attempt at quitting at the age of 40. A highly vocal antiwar activist, as well, he traveled to Iraq months before America invaded the country in 2003, as well as afterwards, then became involved in a contentious contract dispute, with lawsuits flying left and right, in his ongoing rebel-without-a-pause take on authority. Won a Best Actor Oscar in 2004 for his work in Mystic River, while remaining an active voice for his brand of highly partisan liberal politics, including a post-Katrina showing in New Orleans trying to rescue people. The following annum, he announced he would be taking a multiyear break from filmmaking, while continuing to garner attention for his political activism, including a trip to Iran in 2007. Has also met and penned about other American anathemas, Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Cuba’s Raul Castro. Although his wife initiated divorce proceedings because of his infidelity at year's end, the two reconciled before they went through. In All the King’s Men and Milk, he visited two political personality extremes in his serial assaying of the Kingfish, Huey Long (Joschka Fischer), a 1930s assassinated demagogue and Harvey Milk, an uncloseted and equally confrontative San Francisco city supervisor who met the same fate a little over 40 years later. His bravura abilities are evident in both portraits, as is his willingness to take cinematic chances, in his ongoing self-appointed role as an active, creative, and occasionally self-destructive conscience of America. Won his second Bast Actor Oscar in 2009 for his Milk portrayal, and asked for a more tolerant America. Later that year, he officially filed for divorce, only to withdraw the request once again, in his ongoing on-and-off marriage, before splitting anew. Charged with battery against a photographer, he ultimately got 3 years of informal probation and 300 hours of community service, as well as 36 hours of anger management, in order to curb such sentiments as an earlier wish that his critics would die screaming of rectal cancer. Made an abassador-at-large for Haiti in 2012 for his relief work following the countrys devastating earthquake two years previously. Inner: Feisty, intense, mischievous and chameleonic, with a desire to be seen as hard. Rebellious, but with the capacity for growth, and a true sense of artistry in all that he undertakes, despite a certain humorlessness in some of his public stances. Growing up lifetime of ultimately finding the maturity to bring his true artist forth, and to let the outlaw within feed directly into it. James Dean (1931-1955) - American actor. Outer: His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a farmer turned dental technician who moved his family to Los Angeles when he was 5. His sire was distant and increasingly more jealous of the close relationship between his wife and son. After his mother’s death from cancer when he was 9, his father icily rejected him and he returned to the Midwest on the same train as his deceased mother, to be raised by his sire’s sister and husband on their Indiana farm, where he was molested by his Methodist minister, leaving him even more emotionally scarred. Show-off in school, looking for affection and approval. 5’8”, boyish, with poor eyesight, but a good athlete, although also a heavy smoker. Came to California after high school, attended Santa Monica Jr. College, then UCLA. Began acting with a little theater group, then did bits in films, as well as TV commercials. Went to NYC at 20, and while working as a busboy, got a part in a Broadway play. Observed classes at the Actor’s Studio, did TV drama, where he once played Jesse James on a CBS “You Are There,” then returned to Broadway. Won a screen test from his stage work, and made the most of his subsequent 3 starring films, Rebel Without A Cause, East of Eden and Giant, bringing a naturalness and an electric interior to all 3 roles, despite his relatively limited abilities, which were most pronounced in the latter, when he was clearly out of his depth. Always played himself, but it was more than enough to set his celluloid image on fire, thanks in large part to being able to bring his inner pain out. Also a racing enthusiast, despite being a menace behind the wheel. Two weeks before his death, he made an ironic public service announcement for the National Safety Council on speeding. Named his Porsche spider, ‘Little Bastard,’ and was taking it to Salinas to compete in a race event, when he crashed head-on into a student named Turnupseed. Died from a broken neck. The mechanic who was in car with him, survived but died in a crash 26 years later. Became a cult figure upon his death, with 3000 at his funeral and his youth forever frozen in rebellious triumph, a mythos that has inspired a host of biographies, as well as everlasting fandom. Inner: Bi-sexual, driven, restless, isolated and impenetrable. Alternately charming, then surly, resentful and withdrawn. Filled with contradictions, optimistic and gloomy, great desire to trust and totally untrusting. Sometimes crawled into a fetal position before a scene, and was inordinately obsessive about his performances. Extremely photogenic, which has helped his cult status no end. Made no lasting connections with anyone, spent most of his life as a loner and outsider. Rebel-without-a-pause lifetime of coming through divided parents and then acting as a public icon, living fast, dying young, and insuring his immortality through his time-frozen image of a beautifully troubled youth. Tom Forman (1893-1926) - American actor, screenwriter and director. Outer: Began his film career in 1914, with the Jesse Lasky (Garth Brooks) Production company. Took time off to fight during WW I, where he saw action on the front. Married actress Mary Mersch, one child from union. Appeared in some 50 films as an actor, while directing another 27, and scripting 7. Reached his peak in 1923 with Owen Wister’s (Oliver Stone) The Virginian, and then was only given weak melodramas afterwards. With his career largely in limbo, and his health failing, he was set to direct the ironically titled, The Wreck, but instead, withdrew to a room in his parent’s house, and shot himself in the heart, the day before the film was to begin. Inner: Intermission lifetime of making the transition from the badlands to Hollywoodland, without making much of an imprint on the latter, particularly in comparison with his legendary existences before and after, causing him to summarily and violently opt out via the vehicle of his wounded heart. Jesse James (Jesse Woodson James) (1847-1882) - American outlaw and legend. Outer: Mother, Zerelda (Ann Doran), was a strong, sturdy woman, who had married a charismatic Baptist missionary, Robert James (Chuck Norris) at 17. Had one older brother, Frank (Dennis Hopper), as well as a younger sister. His parents were successful homesteaders and slave-owners, while his sire founded William Jewell College in Missouri. 5’6”, 120lbs, blue eyed and muscular. His father left the family to work in the goldfields when his was 2, and died of pneumonia a year later. Afterwards, his mother remarried a wealthy older man, but her 2nd husband could not get along with his stepsons, and she divorced him and then married a doctor and farmer who kept to himself, and allowed her to raise her boys as she saw fit. In 1863, he was horse-whipped by Union soldiers looking for his brother, while his stepfather was hanged, although survived, which gave him an undying hatred of authority. The following year, he served with Quantrill’s guerrillas during the Civil War under one of that war’s most cutthroat commanders, Bloody Bill Anderson, participating in the cold-blooded execution of 75 Union soldiers in Centralia, Kansas with him. Shot off the tip of his left middle finger cleaning a gun, afterwards, with 3 kills to his credit. His parents were banished to Nebraska by Union soldiers, and he returned with his brother to an empty homestead. Wounded in the chest by soldiers after finding his mother, and was nursed back to health by a cousin, Zee Mimms (Jennifer Connelly), whom he would marry 9 years later, 2 surviving children, as well as a pair of twins who died in infancy. Returned to faming, then began his criminal career after the Civil War, robbing his first bank with his brother at 19. Initially operated at a relatively leisurely pace, doing one or two heists a year, in order to pick up seed money for the next year’s planting. Joined the Cole Younger (David Carradine) gang, and began adding trains to his cash-roll, and, unlike other gangs, robbed their passengers as well. Gained newspaper recognition for the first time via a mistaken revenge killing and a daring escape, and became a deliberate symbol of Johnny Reb resistance to Reconstruction, via an anti-Yankee editor. Won more public support when the obsessive Pinkerton Detective Agency botched a raid on his farm, blowing off one of his mother’s arms, and killing a half-brother. In the latter part of his life, he felt a tremendous pressure from lawmen, because of the politicization of his career, and was looking for a huge score so that he could retire from his trade permanently. The bank at Northfield, Minnesota was to be a culminating robbery, but only he and his brother escaped the ensuing debacle in 1876, when they tried to rob a bank there with their cousins, the Youngers (the Carradines), and others. Rode south and then to Tennessee where he and his sibling both tilled the land for 3 years. Organized a new gang, and for the next year and a half, roamed the midwest and south. After killing a passenger in a train raid, he had a $10,000 price placed on both his and his brother’s head, an unheard of sum at the time. Always returned to his homestead after his crime sprees. After his 2nd gang began to disintegrate, he met at the home of the Ford brothers, Bob Ford (Tex Watson) and Charlie Ford (Charley Manson) to plan a robbery but was shot in the back of the head while straightening out a picture by the former for the reward money. Unarmed at the time, which was unusual for him. Packed in ice and publicly displayed afterwards, while leaving his widow in dire financial straits. As soon as he was buried, several claimants came forward saying they were he in order to capitalize on his legend. Achieved immortality as an icon of individualistic rebellion largely through the ballads and stories and tales that post-ceded him. Inner: Capable of kindly acts, more a creature of circumstance than deliberate mayhem, a victim of the violence of a divided country who was willing to act out what others merely felt. Dressed well, understood the value of publicity and was supremely cool in action, although remained an angry adolescent his entire existence. Good-humoured when young, suspicious, paranoid and moody as he grew older. Great need for attention, as well as to top himself with risks. Violent icon lifetime of unplanned immortality in the realm of six-gun self-expression, with his legend transcending his actualities, to make him a figure of the ages.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS REBEL WITHOUT A PAUSE:
Storyline: The one-man gang rides roughshod over his own anger and alienation before finally finding a point of departure from his past and settling into a far more mature and self-expressive present.

Dennis Hopper (1936-2010) - American actor, director and photographer. Outer: Spent most of his childhood with his grandparents on a 12 acre farm. His father worked for the OSS during WW II, then became a postal worker, while his mother was strong-willed and a religious fundamentalist. One younger brother. Resented his progenitor for hardly ever seeing him, and had a lonely childhood which he spent daydreaming, with only the movies as an escape. Took art classes after moving to Kansas City, before the family headed west to San Diego because of his brother’s respiratory troubles. Became interested in dramatics in high school, over his mother’s objections, and studied at the Old Globe Theater. 5’9”, good athlete, ultimately got a black belt in karate, as well as won a scholarship to the National Shakespeare Festival, and was later helped and tutored by actress Dorothy McGuire. Profoundly affected by actor James Dean (Sean Penn), with whom he had worked on Rebel Without A Cause and Giant. Punched out the messenger who brought the news of that icon’s death, when he heard it. Began smoking marijuana and imitating his projection of Dean, taking on his rebelliousness and finding it more and more difficult to get work because of his reputation, despite good notices in minor roles in major films. Became persona non grata in Hollywood by 21, and lowered the scope of his career to secondary films, dreaming of making his own, while swimming in rivers of cocaine and alcohol. Worked on stage and did 140 TV shows, while also becoming a professional photographer, finding refuge in that medium, as well as painting and sculpting. Proved through his lensmanship, that he did, indeed, have a fine eye for subject matter and composition. Married in his mid-20s to Brooke Hayward, daughter of actress Margaret Sullavan (Bridget Fonda) and producer Leland Hayward, who hated him. One daughter from the union, Marin Hopper, who eventually edited a book of his photographs. Became an enflamed revolutionary scold in high tier society circles, until his home was ravaged by fire, and he lost many photographs and valued creations. Divorced in 1969, then made Easy Rider, a low-budget no-brainer that proved extremely popular as an anthem to youthful inarticularity, although his abrasive personality made him anything but an easy ride to work with. His next film was an excess in self-worship called The Last Movie, which proved his last movie for a decade. In 1970, he married singer Michelle Phillips for all of 8 days, before she sued for divorce. Left Hollywood for Taos, New Mexico, where he obliterated himself on drink and drugs, making his home, dubbed the Mud Palace, a mecca for those inclined to do likewise, while working mainly in non-U.S. films. In 1972, he married actress Daria Halprin, one daughter from the union, which ended in divorce in 1976. De-toxed in a facility for celebrities and was given the chance to redeem himself. Directed a small Canadian film called Out of the Blue, bringing it in on budget, signaling he was ready to return to commercial filmdom. Hadn’t rid himself of his demons, however, and was soon snorting an ounce of cocaine every few days, and knocking off a gallon of rum daily. Descended into total paranoia, began hearing voices and having violent hallucinations, and was eventually committed to Cedars-Sinai Hospital in 1984, where he returned to Earth after three months, and professed to be clean and sober ever afterwards. After several memorable roles and a solid directorial effort on L.A. gangs, with Sean Penn, he reemerged as one of Hollywood’s favorite villains, in a series of large-budget films. His fourth marriage in 1989, was to actress Katherine LaNasa, who was thirty years younger. It lasted three years and produced his only son. His final union in his late 50s, was to actress Victoria Duffy, who was also three decades his junior, one daughter from the union, which became extremely volatile. Entered the TV lists in 2005 with “E-Ring,” playing a Pentagon colonel, in direct contrast to his antiauthoritarian image, although the show only lasted 2 seasons. Returned to the small screen in 2008 with “Crash,” a cable show based on the Oscar-winning ensemble film exploring racial tensions in Los Angeles, while remaining highly visible through commercials, exhibitions, and continued memorable screen appearances, as an ongoing antidote to ever slipping back into his old ways. Added a final dramatic coda to his life, divorcing his wife after 14 years, so that she wouldn’t contest his will, despite a pre-nup beforehand. Added one final frail appearance for a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, then died of prostate cancer, while barely weighing 100 pounds, surrounded by family and friends at his Venice Beach home. Inner: Volatile, chain smoker and constant substance abuser, working out his inner tensions through creativity and an abrasive, uninhibited personality. Noted art collector with an excellent visual sense. Totally self-obsessed, and completely uninhibited, to the point of out-and-out paranoia. Letting loose lifetime of using his legendary former brother as a role model while tapping into his violent past to exorcise his various demons in a roller-coaster ride fashioned out of vehicles of his own making, before allegedly cleaning up his act to become the artist long hiding within. Frank James (1843-1915) - American outlaw. Outer: Parents were successful homesteaders and slaveowners. Mother, Zerelda (Ann Moran) was a strong, sturdy and deeply protective woman, who married his sire at 17. Father, Robert James (Chuck Norris) was a charismatic Baptist missionary. Older of 2 surving sons, and brother of Jesse James (Sean Penn). One younger sister, as well. His father left the family to work in the goldfields when he was 6, and died of pneumonia. His mother then remarried an older, wealthy man, who didn’t care for his sons, and she divorced him to marry a doctor and farmer who allowed her to raise her boys as she wished. Became a bushwhacker and served with Quantrill’s guerrillas during the Civil War under one of that conflict’s most lethal commanders, Bloody Bill Anderson, with whom he participated in the annihilation of Lawrence, Kansas. His parents were banished to Nebraska by Union soldiers, and he returned with his brother to an empty homestead. Went back to farming, but began his outlaw career with his brother after the war, doing his first bank at 23. They were soon joined by their cousins, the Younger Bros. (Carradines) in a crime spree, robbing banks and then trains in Missouri and other contiguous states. Eloped with a 17 year old farmer’s daughter, one son from union. Only he and his brother escaped the Northfield, Minnesota botched robbery disaster in 1876. Rode south and then to Tennessee where they both worked the land for 3 years. Organized a new gang, and for the next year and a half, roamed the midwest and south. After killing a passenger in a train raid, he had a $10,000 price placed on both his and his brother’s head, an exorbitant sum of the time, feeding into their legendary status as wanted outlaws. Moved to Virginia, then surrendered 5 months after his brother was shot by Bob Ford (Tex Watson). Walked into the governor’s office, gave up his gun, and the clamor over the death of Jesse James gave him a very receptive set of juries. After a series of trials, he was freed and returned to his farm, living the rest of his life without incident, occasionally appearing at local fairs with Cole Younger (David Carradine), also the singular surviving member of his outlaw family. Died of heart disease on the farm where he was born. Inner: Volatile but with the facility for change and growth. Circular lifetime of acting as a participatory support for a living legend, and living long enough to enjoy a peaceful afterlife to his shoot-em-up, roller-coaster rebellious ways.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LESSER GANG MEMBER:
Storyline: The second son follows his big brother’s footsteps, while keeping his profile low, in keeping with his ancient outlaw past.

Chris Penn (1962-2006) - American actor. Outer: Father was director Leo Penn, mother was actress Eileen Ryan. Younger brother of actor Sean Penn and musician Michael Penn. Grew up in a theatrical home, that encouraged his self-expression, and followed his older brother in pursuing a show business career. Began acting at the age of 12 with the Loft Studio. Large and soft-featured, with an affinity for criminal and working-class roles, and a natural facility for law enforcement officials as well. Got into drugs when the baby he had with a girlfriend died. Devastated afterwards, he turned to work to try straighten out his interior. Made his film debut in 1983 Rumble Fish. Appeared with his brother as siblings in At Close Range in 1986, while their mother played their grandmother. 6’2”, ultimately over 300 lbs. Also did a notable turn as Nice Guy Eddie Cabot in the 1992 Tarantino cult film, Reservoir Dogs, for which he is best remembered. Most of his parts were of the support variety, in keeping with his ongoing role as secondary gang member in memorable clans, despite his desire to be a leading man. Became larger as he grew older, thanks to his ongoing struggles with alcohol and drugs, while racking up several arrests for DUI, reckless driving and carrying a gun without a permit. Spent his last two decades working on a Vietnam movie which he wished to write and direct and ultimately was found dead in his bed at 40, by his housekeeper. Two days later, Joaquin Phoenix flipped his car, but was unhurt, in a nod to the passing of a fellow crypto-gang member. Later found to have died of cardiomyopahty, a deadly heart condition, brought on by the ingestion of a prescription cough syrup. Inner: Highly likable, but a victim of his own excesses. Kept his personal self largely hidden, despite a public career. Heavy-hearted lifetime of learning his licks in the acting profession as a support figure, while giving in to his bodily needs to obliterate emotional problems via vast intakes of whatever was available to control his moods. John Harron (1903-1939) - American actor. Outer: From a large but poor immigrant Irish family. Two of his 8 siblings, Robert (Peter Lawford) and Tessie (Jennifer Connelly) became actors, although all three would be fated to early exits. Made his movie debut as a teen with an unbilled part in one of his brother’s vehicles Hearts of the World in 1918. Two years later, his sibling died suspiciously in a gun incident, which was probably a suicide, and the publicity handed him from the tabloids, insured him of an easy entry into Hollywood. 6’1”. Easily slid into his sibling’s shoes, and became a wholesome romantic lead in hundreds of films during the silent era, although he never was able to match his brother’s fame. By the time sound came in, he was reduced to bit parts in ‘B’ movies. In 1929, he married actress Betty Westmore, who gave up her career for motherhood, one daughter from the union, making him the only member of his large family to marry and reproduce. Let his career play out over the next decade, and after completing his final film, went to Seattle to relax and go fishing. After arriving, however, he was struck with a violent headache and checked into a hospital. Died shortly afterwards of spinal meningitis. Inner: Probably harbored a strong sense of lack of support and fatally internalized it. Substitute player lifetime of gaining easy entry to filmdom, only to quickly play himself out, and then do an early fade only to repeat the same general dynamic as the younger brother of a far bigger star. Charlie Pitts (Samuel Wells) (?-1876) - American outlaw. Outer: Rode as an active member with the Jesse James (Sean Penn) gang, committing numerous robberies, until he was finally gunned down in the botched Northfield, Minnesota raid, dying with all his guns emptied and five bullet holes in his chest. Inner: Support lifetime of riding with the most legendary gang of the old West, to prove his heart and courage, before learning the lessons of excessive will, but not quite the effects of personal excess, which he would act out in a further life in this seres.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS STRAIGHT ARROW STRAIGHT SHOOTER:
Storyline: The straight-laced warrior takes it upon himself to be an upright model of integrity, fortitude and morality in his personification of the triumphant nature of good in its ongoing never-ending battle with the cardboard evils of the world.

vChuck Norris (Carlos Norris) (1940) - American actor and martial artist. Outer: Both sides of the family were of mixed Irish and Cherokee blood. Named after a family minister, oldest of 3 sons. Father was an itinerant auto mechanic, bus and truck driver, who was also an alcoholic that couldn’t hold a job. Grandmother was the steadying influence on the struggling family, who settled in California when he was 9. His sire was often absent, and his parents divorced when he was 16, before his mother remarried a far more supportive progenitor. Initially wanted to be a police officer. 5’10”, 170 lbs. Enlisted in the Air Force to join the military police, and was called Chuck in bootcamp, and the name stuck. Not a natural athlete, he took judo lessons in Korea in order to improve his skills. Had to work hard but eventually became a karate black belt. After his discharge, he went to work as a file clerk for Northrup Aircraft, then started a karate school with borrowed money. Began entering karate tourneys to attract publicity and more students. Married in his late 20s to Diane Holechek in a close union, where he considered his wife his best friend. 3 children, 2 sons became actors. The duo eventually divorced 30 years later. Met karate master Bruce Lee and the pair began training together. Lee got him bit parts, which led to a role in Return of the Dragon, and a memorable fight scene in the Roman coliseum, where one of his kicks to Lee’s head may have inadvertantly fed into that actor’s premature death. Developed a trademark spinning back kick, and became a world middleweight karate champion from 1968 to 1974, holding an 8th-degree black belt as a grandmaster in tae kwon do. Established 5 schools, but because of bad management, he had to sell them, which forced him into a movie career, which began in 1969 with The Wrecking Crew. An extremely limited actor, he nevertheless found a repetitive role for himself as a heroic loner, with minimal dialogue. His younger brother was killed in Vietnam in 1970, and he subsequently made 2 cinematic tributes to him. Harbored a great desire to be a clean-cut role model, avoiding sex in his films, and concentrating on action, where the white hats always triumph. Later established himself as a popular TV star in “Walker, Texas Ranger,” and created Kickstart, a foundation dedicated to character-building through the martial arts. Remarried Gena O’Kelley, a former model nearly three decades his junior, in 1998, twins from the union. Co-wrote his autobiography, “Against All Odds: My Story,” in 2004, and continued putting pen to paper with a series of Western novels, with Christian themes. Also launched the World Combat League, a martial arts competition with teams from 8 cities, and male and female participants, as well as invented a new martial arts form known as Chun Kuk Do, replete with its own code of honor. Became actively involved in the 2008 presidential race with an enthusiastic endorsement of Mike Huckabee, and continued his hectoring afterwards via internet columns, with a particular antipathy towards gay boy scouts, and Barack Obama policies in general. Inner: Positive thinker, conservative, admirer of values of the religious right, archfoe of permissiveness. Loving family man, and a creationist, as well as a cultural phenomenon, as the object of satire by some, and serious Christian consideration by others. Has a great love for westerns and idealized braveheart values. White hat lifetime of having a sire to serve as his teacher of opposites, before developing his innate athleticism to serve as an upbeat, heroic role model for the traditional values he was denied as a youngster. vFred Thompson (Frederick Thomson) (1890-1928) - American actor/athlete and minister. Outer: Father was a Presbyterian minister, a pathway his son elected to follow as well, after growing up in a religious atmosphere. Often beaten by his sire “in the name of God.” Mother was a 4’11” dynamo, and the only survivor of a brood of 13, who had all caught TB from their father. After marrying a dying medical student, and becoming widowed, she got a master’s degree, then wed her late husband’s brother. Third of 4 brothers, with the youngest an excellent athlete. Grew up wanting to please, while his father, in addition to being a pastor, was also a surveyor, a civil engineer and a teacher among other occupations, while proving unsuccessful at all of them. In addition to excelling at all athletics, he was a good student. 6’2”, blue-eyed and sandy-haired, with handsome chiseled features. Studied to be a clergyman at Occidental College and Princeton Theological Seminary, where he stood out as a student/athlete, playing football, baseball, and running track, as well as being elected president of the student body. Well-read, with musical abilities as well, to top off his all-around attractiveness. National 10 Events Champion in 1910, 1911 and 1913, and world champion all-around athlete in 1913, the year in which he also married, although his wife died 3 years later. Did not try out for the Olympics in 1912, since he was morally opposed to competing on Sundays, despite the fact he would assuredly have made the team. After his father died, he was ordained a minister in his early 20s, and served in Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and in Las Vegas, where he was a scoutmaster and later Boy Scout Commissioner. Enlisted as a chaplain in WW I, and while convalescing with a broken leg in an army hospital, met screenwriter Frances Marion, becoming her 3rd husband in his late 20s, one natural son, one adopted one. Moved to Hollywood, left the ministry and entered films, feeling children learned a lot from the screen. His rugged athleticism and good looks soon made him a star in cowboy vehicles, which featured difficult stunts that he performed, rarely using a double. With his horse Silver King, he became one of the top action performers of the 1920s, although his 7 year career was abruptly ended when he suddenly died of pneumonia in a hospital in his wife’s arms. Inner: Consistently shunned spotlight. Teetotaler, nonsmoker, pleasing persona. Probably had conflicts between his initial chosen path, the ministry, and the heroic mold in which he was recast, as movie star, ultimately resolving them by an early death and a life of far greater struggle in order to integrate his need to be both heroic and Lord-loving. Straight arrow lifetime of turning a childhood dominated by an unstable father, but balanced by a dynamic mother, into his own sense of heroic spirituality, in order to give himself a righteous pathway, while pleasing as many people as he possibly could in the process. Robert James (Robert Sallee James) (1818-1850) - American preacher and farmer. Outer: Of Welsh descent. Grew up in Kentucky, after his parents, natives of Virginia, moved there. One of nine children, and the third of five sons. Went to a seminary, Georgetown College, where he showed a gift for oratory and study. Met Zerelda Cole (Ann Doran) while lecturing at a nearby female school, and the two wed in 1841, prior to moving to Missouri, where her folks were. Left her there to get his degree, then bought a small farm, where he raised commercial hemp. The duo had three surviving children, two sons and a daughter, with the former two, Frank (Dennis Hopper) and Jesse James (Sean Penn) becoming outlaw legends in the post-Civil War period. Returned again to Georgetown, getting his Masters, while serving as the pastor of the New Hope Baptist Church, increasing its membership many fold. Also served as one of the founders of William Jewell College, a Baptist institution, in 1849 in Liberty, Missouri. After eight years in the “show me” state, he headed west, leaving his wife and young children behind at the outset of the gold rush, to both prospect and preach, only to come down with cholera, and die at the Hangtown Gold camp in northern California. Ignominiously wound up in an unmarked grave, while leaving his family in debt. Inner: Kindly and a man of God, with a genuine gift for elevating those who heard him preach. Charismatic and restless, while always looking for far more golden pastures. Disappearing act lifetime of dedicating himself to God and fathering a legendary brood of outlaws, before subconsciously distancing himself from them early on, so as to maintain his ongoing white hat sense of himself, free of the future contamination of his lawless seed.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS REPRISER OF HERSELF:
Storyline: The miscreants’ mother winds up playing herself as a means to review her earlier go-round, while also rejoining her legendary family in its pursuit of self-expression through acting, rather than acting out the anger and violence within many of them.

Ann Doran (1911–2000) - American actress. Outer: Mother was silent screen actress Rose Allen. Worked as a child model, and made her screen debut in 1922 in Robin Hood, before focusing on her education, and returning to the screen a dozen years later. Became a dependable character actress, working in both comedy and drama, as well as serials, shorts and series, with one feature lead to her credit, Rio Grande in 1938, and several co-leads with comic actor Charley Chase (Dan Aykroyd). Worked on almost all director Frank Capra’s films as one of his favorite supports. Her most memorable role would be as James Dean’s (Sean Penn) mother in Rebel Without A Cause in 1955, in a crypto-reprisal of playing the same role in real life a century earlier. Never married. Continued doing maternal roles as a guest star on various series. Played her former self, Zerelda James, in the 34-episode TV series “The Legend of Jesse James” in 1965 and 1966. Continued working up until 1988, before retiring and then passing away from complications following a series of strokes. Managed to save enough to bequeath $400,000 to the Motion Picture Country House & Hospital, a retirement home. Always received good reviews for her work, and ultimately appeared in over 500 films and TV shows by her own count. Inner: Thrifty, hardworking, strong-willed and largely wedded to her career. Self-referencing lifetime of entering the same sphere as her progeny as a ubiquitous presence enhancing whoever she played off of, while getting a chance to re-view herself through the fictive lens of play-acting. Zerelda James (Zerelda Cole) (1825-1911) - American matriarch. Outer: Both sides of her family had fought courageously in the Revolutionary War. Father broke his neck in a riding accident when she was a year old, and she was raised early on in the house of a paternal grandfather who was a saloonkeeper. Had one younger brother, who eventually committed suicide in 1895. Mother remarried a farmer, who she didn’t like, and she wound up living with some maternal relatives in Kentucky, going to a Catholic girl’s school there, where she heard Robert James (Chuck Norris), a seminarian, lecture, and was entranced by him, although refused to be cowed by his belief that women should be silent and submissive. At 16, she wed him, and the following year, she returned to Missouri, to wait for him to graduate. Once he did, they bought a farm where they raised commercial hemp farm, replete with slaves. The duo had four children, Frank (Dennis Hopper), a son who died in infancy, the infamous Jesse (Sean Penn) and a daughter, whom she eventually outlived. Following the birth of their last child in 1849, her spouse moved to California to preach to the gold miners there, as well as pan for gold, only to die the following year from cholera. In 1852, she wed a wealthy farmer who disliked her boys and probably abused them. Left him, and he died in 1854 from a fall from a horse. In 1855, she wed a doctor, Dr. Reuben Samuel, who was quiet and passive, and had four more children with him, two sons and two daughters, with one of the former, her last, dying at 10. Outlived her last husband, as well, who died three years before her. The notoriety of her sons, particularly the iconic Jesse, made their farm a tourist attraction, and to capitalize on it, she charged a dollar for a house tour, including Jesse’s grave, which was originally in the frontyard. Had a great fear his body would be stolen, so that he was buried extra deep in the ground, while she sold pebbles from his site, which she continually replenished from a nearby stream. Died of a heart ailment while on a train traveling west. Inner: Forceful and outspoken. Keeper of the flame lifetime of giving birth to a midwestern legend, and then husbanding her progeny in both life and afterlife, before returning to review herself through the prism of make-believe.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS BRIGHT FLAME-OUT:
Storyline: The purifying phoenix cannot rid himself of his own self-immolating fires, no matter how much he cleans up his overt act.

River Phoenix (1971-1993) - American actor. Outer: Parents were nature-loving hippies, and named their son after the river of life in Herman Hesse’s “Siddhartha.” Father was a former carpenter, mother was a Jewish secretary from the Bronx. The duo had met as migrant fruit pickers and became missionaries for the Children of God sect. When their son was 2, the family went to South America, where his father served as “Archbishop of Venezuela and the Caribbean Islands.” Claimed to have lost his virginity at 4. A year later, his family returned to the U.S. broke and disillusioned, living with his mother’s parents in Florida, before she became determined that they all enter show business, and they moved to Los Angeles, changing the family name to Phoenix as symbol of their determination to rise from their own ashes. All 5 children were geared towards the entertainment world, younger brother Joaquin and sisters Summer and Rain also entered show business, when their mother got them an agent, after securing a job as a secretary with NBC. Raised a vegetarian, and also refused to wear leather. By 10, he was acting professionally on TV; made his film debut in his mid-teens in Explorers, and the following year, he drew notice in Stand By Me. 5’11”. Soon was viewed as an outstanding young talent, while becoming a bellwether of clean living, often admonishing his fellow actors for breeches in health. Formed a band, Aleka’s Attic, and seemed poised on the breech of a brilliant adult career, but went into convulsions outside a Hollywood night club, actor Johnny Depp’s Viper Room, from a cocaine and heroin combination called a speedball and died on Halloween. Often compared with James Dean for his brief, but brilliant career, and equally speedy exit. Inner: Incandescent talent, well-loved, with a rich purity about him, both on and off-screen. Inner demon lifetime of acting as an archetype of clean, wholesome living and luminous self-expression, while in actuality, he was continually dealing with his ongoing darkness within and ultimately letting it prevail, rendering him, once again ,to ashes. Nick Adams (Nicholas Adamshock) (1931-1968) - American actor. Outer: Father was a Lithuanian-American coal miner. Grew up in poverty. Graduated from St. Peter’s College, then joined the Coast Guard, before coming to Hollywood. Began his film career in his early 30s, with Somebody Loves Me. Idolized James Dean (Sean Penn), and was one of crypto-James Gang members to play in Rebel Without A Cause, and also to make a premature exit. Allegedly bisexual, he admitted to intimates that he had affairs with both Dean and Elvis Presley. Inconsolable after the former’s death in 1955, he was arrested 9 times for reckless driving the following year. Married and divorced actress Carol Nugent, 2 children from union. Went to court and won custody of the children, after accusing his wife’s boyfriend of excessively disciplining them. Played leads throughout the 1950’s and 1960s, as a restless wanderer, best known for the TV series, “The Rebel,” his own personal anthem, about an erroneously cashiered Confederate cavalry commander. A heavy drinker, he began taking paraldehydrade, a drug for delerium tremens. Died from an overdose of drugs that he was using for a nervous disorder. Found sitting upright and dressed. Some mystery remains around his demise, since he had just gotten a part in a film and his career was about to revive. Inner: Restless escapist with a strong disposition towards self-destruction. Observant Catholic. Mirror lifetime of following his former leader of the pack into the fantasy realm of acting in order to find a better means for integrating himself than the sheer violence of his past, although without the self-discipline to make it happen. Reeves Eason (Barnes Reeves Eason, Jr.) (1914-1921) - American actor. Known as ‘Breezy.’ Outer: Father was western director William Reeves Eason. Began appearing as an infant in his sire’s films, and quickly developed into a cute support of action stars, with his blond, camera-friendly good looks. Billed as “Universal’s Littlest Cowboy,” he appeared in 12 films. In 1921, he had his first starring role in The Big Adventure, but during his next shoot, The Fox, he was accidentally run over by a truck. Inner: Truncated lifetime of an extremely early exit in his ongoing struggles between his keen creativity and deep-seated sense of self-obliteration. Clell Miller (McClelland Miller) (1850-1876) - American outlaw. Outer: From a farm family. At 14, he joined Bloody Bill Anderson’s guerrilla band, and was captured by Union soldiers. Because of his youth, he was sent to prison, and his father won his release in 1865. 5’8” with dark red auburn hair. Older brother of Ed Miller (Joaquin Phoenix), who had earlier become part of the James-Younger bank-robbing gangs. After going back to farming, he joined up with them in 1871, and took part in most of their subsequent robberies, culminating in the Northfield, Minnesota Raid in 1876, in which a prepared vigilante citizenry opened fire on the bandits. Shot full in the face with a load of buckshot, and rode crazily up and down the street, firing his gun blindly, accidentally killing someone running out of his way, before dropping and dying of his wounds. His father later reclaimed his body for burial at home. Inner: Blaze out lifetime of exchanging the pastoral life for violent adventure, only to have his face, a symbol of his identity, blown away, in his own ongoing search for balance between his strong esthetic and violently enflamed nature.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS RESURRECTED REBEL:
Storyline: The kindhearted highwayman rises phoenix-like from his own ashes to become the popular actor he had always wanted to be, after twice falling victim to outlaw violence not of his making.

Joaquin Phoenix (1974) - American actor. Outer: Father, originally named John Bottom, was a hippie carpenter, mother had been a Jewish secretary from the Bronx, who left her husband and job and hit the road, after the duo had met as migrant fruit pickers. They became missionaries for the Children of God sect, moving frequently, while taking short term labor in Venezuela, the Caribbean Islands, where he was born, Texas and Florida, where they lived with his mother’s parents, until returning to Los Angeles, broke and disillusioned, before changing the family name to Phoenix as symbol of their determination to resurrect. 3rd of 5 children, younger brother of actor River Phoenix, and actresses Summer and Rain Phoenix. Originally called Leaf. A vegan from the age of 3, in an unconscious attempt at purging himself of his past, after watching fishermen brutally killing their catch. His mother obtained a job with NBC’s casting office as a secretary, and got her children agents. Sang songs on the streets of Westwood with his siblings, while being shielded from mass culture, despite his parents’ desire they all become actors. Followed his brother into that profession, from the age of 8, with TV appearances, and made his film debut in 1987 in Space Camp. Turned down numerous other parts as troubled teens, in an unconscious desire not to repeat the patterns of his previous go-round in this series. 5’8”, with a distinctive scar above his lip. Went to Costa Rica at 16 to live for 3 years with his father on a ranch his brother had purchased, then returned to pursue his acting career fulltime. With his brother when he died of a drug overdose outside the Viper Club in LA, in another purging of his violent past. Had his breakthrough role as a dim-witted teenager in 1995 in To Die For, then did a series of forgettable films, until his high-profile supporting role as the emperor Commodus (David Lloyd George) in Gladiator. Several subsequent incoherent appearances on late night TV dampened his public image, despite his claim of deliberately acting dazed and confused. Remains extremely close with his family, while giving vent to the full career that was denied him his previous go-round. In 2005, he checked into rehab to deal with alcohol abuse, and has been a regular attendee at AA meetings ever since. Learned guitar and did all the singing for Walk the Line, a biopic of singer and cleaned-out drug addict Johnny Cash, adding to his lustre as one of the more interesting screen personalities of his generation. Two days after Chris Penn’s death, he flipped his car, although walked out unscathed after being discovered by none other than Werner Herzog, in an unconscious operatic nod to the passing of an old gang member. Extremely picky about scripts, preferring to pursue other interests in between films, such as shooting musical videos. After more erratic behavior, he announced in 2008 he was retiring from acting to pursue music fulltime, then gave a bizarre monosyllabic interview on David Letterman to underscore his lack of interest in his larger career, which may or may not have been a put-on underscoring his intense concern with his lesser career. It would be later revealed to be a performance art piece as pre-publicity for a 2010 mock documentary called I’m Still Here. Returned to the big screen in fine form in 2012 as the foil in The Master, showing himself to be very much in control of his acting life, despite all his histrionics to the contrary. Inner: Mystical, prayerful, down-to-Earth, and determined not to make the same mistakes he did before. Great sense of emptiness, confusion and loneliness after completing a performance. More of a desire to be his characters, than merely perform, allowing him to completely immerse himself in them. Self-deprecating, warm and polite, with little desire to be an icon. Resurrected lifetime of an extremely itinerant, impoverished childhood held together by love, giving him the base for a full-blown career that was earlier denied him. Sal Mineo (1939-1976) - American actor. Outer: Mother was an active go-getter, who loved theater and music. Father was a gentle, soft-hearted casket-maker from Sicily. 3rd of 4 children and youngest of 3 sons. Very close family, which was also surrounded by cousins who lived nearby in the Bronx. 5’6”, handsome, warm and gentle, despite his later screen image of a tough young punk. Took dancing lessons with his sister at 9, then studied drama, before making his Broadway debut with a walk-on role in “The Rose Tattoo.” Served as an understudy for a year in “The King and I,” then won the role of the young prince of Siam. Made his film debut in 1955 in Six Bridges to Cross, but resisted pressure to change his name to make it less ethnic, feeling proud of his heritage. Scored his first big success in Rebel Without A Cause, and hero-worshipped its star, James Dean (Sean Penn), who served as his protective mentor. After the latter’s death, the studio wanted to make him into a Dean clone, and he was given a series of punk roles that didn’t vary. His family always chose his parts for him, rather than a professional agent, limiting his career. Recorded several singles and an album, despite a thin voice, and became a teenage idol. A free-spender with his money, he was always generous and giving, while staying rooted to his family. After being linked with numerous actresses, he discovered he was bisexual in his early 20s, which made him question his life and values. Reached a high-point with the film Exodus, and then the roles stopped coming, so that his highly public career was virtually over by his early 20s, and he was cleaned out by tax problems. Began doing low budget roles, as well as TV, actively taking on homophile roles and controversial subjects. Hollywood saw him as a has-been, as he moved to a small apartment, while becoming openly gay. Involved with actor Courtney Burr. Did dinner theater, also directed “Fortune and Men’s Eyes,” which was panned for his graphic take on homophile prison life. Moved to London, then returned to do more theater, while remaining continually optimistic. Just before a production of “P.S. Your Cat Is Dead” in which he starred, was about to open, he was knifed in the chest by a robber in his apartment’s underground garage. The murderer was eventually caught after bragging to his wife of the deed. Inner: Warmhearted, generous, kind and sensitive, with a great desire to be an adept actor, despite limited skills. Brief glimpse lifetime of being taken out by the misfortune of other men’s eyes, perhaps as recompense for his earlier outlawry. Ross Alexander (Ross Smith) (1907-1937) - American actor. Outer: Father was a leather merchant. Began his stage career at 16, and after an extremely promising start, in the ironically titled, “Let Us Be Gay,” was felt to be star material. His film debut in 1932 in The Wiser Sex, however, failed to generate audience interest, and he returned to Broadway aftrerwards. Signed to another contract two years later by Warner Bros., when he was in his mid-20s. 6’1”, lithe and pleasant looking. Married actress Aleta Freel in 1934, who killed herself with a shotgun the following year. Had his biggest successes mid-decade with Midsummer Night’s Dream and Captain Blood, reputedly becoming involved with its costar, Errol Flynn (Ethan Hawke), a fellow bisexual. An obsession with actress Bette Davis led to a subsequent physical confrontation by her husband. In 1936, he married one of his co-stars, actress Anne Nagel. Deeply in debt, he committed suicide by a gunshot wound to the head, using the same weapon employed by his earlier spouse, in what may also have been an empathetic act on his part to her memory. Ronald Reagan became his studio replacement, having somewhat the same voice and manners. His final film, with another ironic title, Ready, Willing and Able, was released posthumously. Inner: Had a familiarity with firearms, and was supposedly an expert shot. Blown out candle lifetime of peaking in his early youth, and then finding himself played out by his late 20s, in a recompense go-round for his earlier violence, replete with an earlier spousal reminder of his innate self-destructive nature. Ed Miller (c1856-1881) - American outlaw. Outer: From a farming family, younger brother of Clell Miller (River Phoenix). Following the civil war, he joined the Jesse James (Sean Penn) gang, and participated in several of their bank and train robberies, adding his brother to the mix, although he also operated apart from them, and was not involved in the Northfield Minnesota debacle in 1876, where his sibling was killed. Rejoined the gang in 1879, when it was reassembled and participated in several more bank and train holdups, but was killed by James when he proposed giving himself up to the law, or perhaps ratted out the crew to a marshal one drunken night. Inner: Blazing candle lifetime of living by the credo of being honest while living outside the law and suffering ignominiously for his efforts.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS STARR-CROSSED SCOUNDREL:
Storyline: The thorny trickster allows his eccentric anti-sociality to bubble up in his characterizations, while trying to keep his life relatively clear of the murderous urges from past inabilities to reconcile anger with self-expression.

fBilly Bob Thornton (1955) - American actor and director. Outer: Of Irish descent. Father was a high-school basketball coach and his/story teacher, mother was a psychic who was denounced as a witch by the KKK. One of 4, and oldest of 3 sons, he grew up in rural Arkansas, without running water or electricity. Both his father and younger brother died tragically. Wanted to be a baseball pitcher, although he failed in a major league tryout, breaking his collarbone. Ran wild, acted in high school plays, then worked in a nursing home and at a screen-door factory, and also attended Henderson State Univ. 6’, and slim. Appeared in several rock’n’roll bands. Married Melissa Lee Gatlin for 2 years in the late 70s, one daughter, Amanda, from the union, who later who would be charged with child neglect and then murder, in the death of a 1 year old girl she had been babysitting, ultimately receiving a 20 year sentence. Moved to NYC after his divorce, but lasted all of 10 hours, totally blown away by the intensity of the city. Returned home, then headed out to Los Angeles, where he had a series of dismal jobs, and wound up in the hospital from not eating. Finally found support through some Arkansas connections, and existed in the Hollywood backwaters as an eccentric character actor on TV. In the mid-80s he married and divorced actress Toni Lawrence. Married a 3rd time to actress Cynda Williams in 1990, divorced the following year, and in the early 90s, wed Playboy model Pietra Cherniak, 2 sons from the union. Finally hit the big/time in 1996 with his own Sling Blade, playing a retarded killer, in which he totally encompassed the character, down to his physical looks, after having invented him during his earlier, leaner days. After his triumph, and an Academy Reward for best adapted screenplay, he divorced his wife, and she, in turn, accused him of physical abuse. Continued his career in a similar vein, playing distorted characters, while enjoying his newfound status as a well-appreciated Hollywood eccentric, while continuing to distort his looks in a series of oddball portrayals. Also released several albums during the decade as a singer-songwriter connected with the Boxmasters, a blues band. In 2000, he married actress Angelina Jolie, in a tempestuous relationship of 2 old-time wild west legends. Both wore vials of each other’s blood around their necks, and each had the other’s name tattooed on various parts of their bodies, although he left her in 2002, soon after the couple adopted a Thai baby, and the duo divorced, much to her shock and hurt. Later had a daughter with special-effects technician and actress, Connie Angland, while announcing marriage was no longer for him. Despite an ungrounded private life, his screen career remains memorable, thanks to a facility for choosing roles which play to his strengths of characterization. Inner: Trickster sensibilities with a barely buried outlandishness, that surfaces each time he takes on a role. Has a host of phobias, as a result of an obsessive/compulsive disorder. Slings and arrows of outrageous fortune lifetime of trying to channel his innate anti-sociality into creative outlets, although still prone to his old ways around women. Jack Holt (Charles John Holt) (1888-1951) - American actor. Outer: Father was an Episcopal minister. Born in NYC, although he later claimed Virginia as his birthplace. Had an athletic upbringing, and became a superior polo player. Went to private school In NYC, then when his sire’s health forced the family to move to a warmer clime, he attended Virginia Military Institute, only to be expelled for bad behavior, which curtailed his desire to become a lawyer, and, instead, he took to the road. 6’, 184 lbs. with a strong masculine presence and a noticeable granite jaw, which cartoonist Chester Gould later claimed was his model for square-jawed Dick Tracy. Mined copper in Alaska, labored as both a railroad and civil engineer, cowboyed, and hit the lights with a traveling theater company. While surveying in San Francisco, he volunteered for a stunt ride off a cliff in 1914, and suddenly had a new career as a stunt and bit player. Moved to Hollywood, and began appearing in John Ford (David Fincher) and Francis Ford’s (Edward Norton) westerns, before starring in serials of his own. In 1916, he married Margaret Woods. In addition to a stepdaughter from his wife’s first marriage, they had a son and daughter. Tim Holt and Jennifer Holt, both of whom became western stars. In 1917, he moved to Paramount and did a successful series of Westerns based on the novels of Zane Grey to become one of the highest paid stars of the silent era. Such was his status, that he became one of the 36 founding members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences during the 1920s. When the movie industry moved into sound pictures at the of the 20s, he made the easy transition, and continued his career in adventure films and as a character actor. Although he remained officially married, he and his wife stopped living together for many a decade prior to his death. Served as a horse buyer for the cavalry at the outbreak of WW II at the behest of Gen. George C. Marshall, and made numerous filmic appearances afterwards, in both major and minor films, as characters in the former and western leads in the latter. Never worked with both of his children at the same time, although he appeared in a support role in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, his son’s greatest costarring role. Died of a heart attack. Inner: Athletic and a natural filmic presence. Granite-jawed lifetime joining his crypto-family on the silver screen for a highly successful career that never really stretched him as an actor, although fed into his ongoing sense of mischief and adventure. fSam Starr (1859-1886) - American outlaw. Outer: Of Amerindian descent, with full-blooded Cherokee parents. Father was the notorious renegade Tom Starr (Randolph Scott), who somehow took the full measure of his years, despite numerous violent episodes in his legendary life. One of the younger siblings of a large family. Like father, like son, he turned to outlawry and became a horse thief. Married Belle Reed (Angelina Jolie) in 1880, and the two continued to follow his chosen profession, until they were arrested in 1883. Spent 6 months in jail and then reclaimed their outlaw ways, until they were arrested once again for horse thievery, harboring fugitives and robbing a wealthy farmer, although both were let go for insufficient evidence. Ended his career with a shootout with a lawman at a Christmas party during which both parties were killed. Inner: Bad to the bone lifetime of freewheeling mischief on the frontier, before getting his violent comeuppance, as his wife became a legend, while he lent his name to hers.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS ONGOING GOOD GRRL/BAD GRRL:
Storyline: The brazen beauty goes to extremes in exploring herself both on and off-screen, after a frustrating go-round of being given the oomph, but not the foundation for a full-throated career of playing to her strengths as a free-wheeling figure of world renown.

fAngelina Jolie (Angelina Jolie Voight) (1975) - American actress and activist. Outer: Daughter of actress Marcheline Bertrand and actor Jon Voight. Very close to her mother, who was part-French and part-Iroquois, strongly identifying with her. One older brother, James Haven, who became an actor. Her parents split when she was a toddler, and she was raised by her mother, who encouraged her to express herself, and gave her the freedom to do so, while constantly moving. The latter was also an activist, particularly for Amerindian issues, giving her daughter the motivation to pursue a similar path when she grew up. Her father taught her that fame was incidental to her growth as a person, although the 2 would continue to have a contentious relationship, thanks to his cheating on her mother. Made her screen debut at the age of 5 in Lookin’ to Get Out, a film her sire co-wrote and co-produced. Dropped her last name when she decided to become an actress. Began studying at the Lee Strasberg Theater Institute in L.A. in her teens. Worked as a model, and appeared in several high profile music videos, while acting the part of the wild grrrl, replete with self-cuttings, and tattoos including the sentiment in Latin, “what nourishes me, destroys me,” on her lower stomach. 5’8”, with large, expressive eyes and full lips, giving her an arresting beauty, with the inherent talent and acting instinct to complement her outer appeal. Married a co-star, actor Jonny Lee Miller at 20 and separated 2 years later, before amicably divorcing. Felt sick after watching her first real film role in Cyborg 2: Glass Shadow, and re-enrolled in acting school, while also sensing she wasn’t contributing to anyone or anything. Began getting more noticeable roles in the mid-1990s, winning two Golden Globe awards. Had a strong sense of identification with her character portrayals, even though many would be way out on the edge. Her breakthrough big picture role was in 1999’s The Bone Collector, followed by a wild woman turn in Girl, Interrupted. Married fellow former western legend Billy Bob Thornton in 2000, who seemed to have the penchant for bringing out her calamitous past. Signed declarations of their romantic fealty in blood, and then had it notarized, although he left her in 2002, 11 days after they adopted a Thai baby. Crushed by the betrayal, she filed for divorce shortly afterwards, and eschewed relationships for a while, preferring carnal friendships. Extremely active in her social concerns from 2001 onward, she became a goodwill ambassador for the UN High Commission for Refugees, devoting much of her time to helping impoverished people around the world, after visiting refugee camps, and seeing firsthand the horrors of war’s aftermath on the globe’s dispossessed. Returned to action/adventure with Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, and remains Hollywood’s favorite wild-at-heart female star, although her choice of woman-in-peril vehicles wound up strait-jacketing her larger talents for several years. Hooked up with actor Brad Pitt in 2005 after they both appeared in Mr. and Mrs. Smith, and on her own adopted a young Ethiopian boy, before producing a baby girl with him, whose birth in Namibia would be subsequently celebrated as a national holiday there. The couple would become known as Brangelina, with constant media speculation about their ongoing status as a duo, thanks to highly public tiffs, and a never-ending fascination with their dynamic. In 2007, she moved her family to strife-town New Orleans, to escape media fascination, and to raise awareness for the region, in her ongoing save-the-world role as ambassador extraordinaire for the downtrodden, while also maintaining numerous homes elsewhere around the world, including Dubai and Cambodia. Her veneer would be subsequently cracked by offhand comments, and difficult behavior, as she continues to do battle with her basic good girl/bad grrrl dualities, while showing her macha in visiting war-torn African realms where her safety is anything but guaranteed. Adopted a 3 1/2 year old Vietnamese boy to add to her international brood, while being invited to join America’s Council on Foreign Relations. With Pitt, funded Global Action for Children, a Washington lobby working for funding for AIDS orphan programs and children in refugee camps. Devastated by her mother’s death from cancer in 2007, but the same year had her strongest and most meaningful role to date, playing Marianne Pearl, the widow of murdered journalist Daniel Pearl in A Mighty Heart. Had a pair of twins, a boy and girl in Nice, France, in 2008, in her ongoing role as global citizen and fecund earth mother, and subsequently sold pictures of them for a record $14 million. Adjudged the most powerful woman in show business in 2009. In 2013, she underwent a double masatectomy as a preventative against breast cancer because of an overwhelming genetic chance of contracting it. She and Brad Pitt were finally officially wed the following year at their French mansion, surrounded by family and friends, and devoid of paparazzi, thanks to keeping the nuptials secret until they happened. Made an honorary dame by Elizabeth II, in late 2014. Inner: Charismatic screen presence, great ability to get inside her characters. Strong need to make her life relevant. Nonmaterial and bi-sexual but extremely focused, and a hand’s-on mother with help from a host of nannies. Remains jealous over Pitt’s former squeeze, Jennifer Aniston, one of many bones of contention between them. Gives 1/3 of her earnings to charity, thanx to a belief she is egregiously overpaid for what she does. Earlier had a penchant for knives with difficulties in the men in her life, including her father. Save-the-world lifetime of allowing her more uninhibited character prevail, after a relatively corseted go-round, to see where it will ultimately take her in her self-appointed do-good, do-bad dualities, and her burgeoning role as one of the world’s more eminent maternal figures. fAnn Sheridan (Clara Lou Sheridan) (1915-1967) - American actress. Outer: Descendant of Civil War general Philip Sheridan (Alexander Haig). Father owned a garage and a ranch. Youngest of 6. Had a tomboy upbringing, and was a good student. A good shot, she knew how to bulldog steers, and could whistle through her fingers. Also had a large gap between her front teeth, which she later covered with a porcelain cap, whenever a camera was near. 5’5 1/2”, and curvy. Went to North Texas State Teacher’s College with the intention of becoming a teacher, and played on their basketball team. Her sister entered her photo in a ‘Search for Beauty’ beauty contest, which she won, and with it a bit part in a film of the same name in 1933. Appeared under her own name in a series of small roles in some 20 highly forgettable films during her first 2 years in Hollywood for Paramount. In 1936, she married actor Edward Norris, divorced 3 years later. Switched to Warner Bros., who launched a publicity campaign on her behalf, calling her the ‘Oomph Girl,’ a name she despised since it denigrated her larger abilities. The studio also insisted she be seen in nightclubs three times a week in order to give the impression she was highly social. Despite ambivalent feelings about her early experiences in filmdom, she willingly allowed herself to be used, and her career began improving with a series of social-crime melodramas, beginning with Angels with Dirty Faces in 1938. Had extremely expressive eyes, with an obvious intelligence, which was never adequately explored in her various roles. Became one of the favorite pin-ups of WW II soldiers, and scored her first noticeable success in 1942 in King’s Row. The same annum she married actor George Brent, only to divorce him exactly a year later. Continued as a popular star throughout the 1940s, showing an equal aptitude for comedy and drama, as well as a good singing voice in a couple of musicals. The 1950s, however, proved less noteworthy, and by the end of the decade, she was out of films and doing stock and then TV, appearing in a daytime soap opera, “Another World,” and then a situation comedy, “Petticoats and Pistols.” Her third and final marriage was to actor Scott McKay in 1966. No children from any of her unions. A longtime chain smoker, she died of cancer of the esophagus and liver. Inner: Down-to-earth, direct, magnetic, warm and intelligent. Unsupported lifetime of suppressing her innate wild woman in favor of a straight career, despite never quite finding the love or satisfaction she craved, and ultimately self-destructing by allowing her failures to eat at her, rather than let her successes nurture her. fBelle Starr (Myra Maybelle Shirley) (1848-1889) - American outlaw. Outer: Father was from Southern aristocratic stock and was a hotel owner and judge, mother was from the famous feuding clan of the Hatfields. Her elder brother served as a mentor for some of Missouri’s legendary gangs, before being killed. 5’1”. Well-educated in a variety of subjects, she graduated from Carthage Female Academy, an institution her father helped found. Scouted for her guerrilla brother during the Civil War, reporting positions of Union troops, but was also quite domestic, and played the piano. Moved with her family to Texas in 1864, after her hometown was burned down by Confederate guerrillas and 2 years later she married a rustler and bankrobber named Jim Reed (Tim Holt), whom she had known as a schoolgirl, son and daughter from the union, with the latter rumored to be the offspring of Cole Younger (David Carradine), whose gang used to hide out at her parents’ ranch. Close to the members of the Younger/James gang, which probably fed into her own desire to cross over into outlawry. Went into hiding after a robbery by her husband, while spending much time in saloons, drinking and gambling. Rode sidesaddle and was a crackshot, and also dressed in a black velvet riding habit with an ostrich-plumed hat and belts of cartridges across her hips, which fed into the legends that largely clouded her life, and exaggerated her deeds. Occasionally liked to ride through town shooting off her pistols. When her husband killed a man in Arkansas, she headed with him to California, following in a stagecoach with her infant daughter, and the duo lived in Los Angeles, until he was caught passing counterfeit money, and went on the run again, never having been much of a stay-at-home mate. Eluded authorities and returned to live with Reed’s parents, while her spouse took off with another woman, and was eventually killed in 1874. Briefly married one of the Younger gang in 1880, although left him after only 3 weeks, to marry horsethief Sam Starr (Billy Bob Thornton) in 1880. Shortly afterwards, the duo were arrested for equine larceny, the first official acknowledgment of her outlawry. Sentenced to 9 months at the Women’s Workhouse in Detroit, where she was a model prisoner, although proved completely unrepentant once she was released. In 1886, she and her husband were arrested for stealing horses, harboring fugitives and robbing a wealthy farmer, although they were acquitted on all charges. Starr was killed in a shootout with a lawman at a Christmas party, and she took on a host of monickered lovers, Jack Spaniard, Jim French, and Blue Duck among them, who were either killed or went off on their own happy trails. Her fourth and final marriage was to Sam Starr’s adopted brother, who was part Cherokee and some 15 years her junior. Shot while on horseback by an unknown bushwhacker, while she was eating a piece of corn bread, then shot again as she lay dying of wounds to the back, neck, shoulder and face. Her killer was never found, but it was probably one of her sharecroppers, who feared she would collect the price he had on his head for a murder in Florida. Inner: Part homemaker and part outlaw, and largely uninhibited, with a penchant for publicity, and a great desire to be noticed. Legendary lifetime of serving as a female icon for a western wild woman, while in actuality, she combined a sense of domesticity with adventure and with reckless companions in her ongoing exploration of her various dualities.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS LITERAL & FIGURATIVE MIDNIGHT COWBOY:
Storyline: The good boy/bad boy rehabilitates himself via a strong Catholic sense of right and wrong, and a challenging career of trying never to repeat himself, while actively seeking to better the larger world, at the expense of the smaller more intimate world around him.

Jon Voight (Jonathan Voight) (1938) - American actor. Outer: Of Czechoslovakian descent. Three of his grandparents had emigrated from central Europe, with one working as a coal miner. Father was a professional golfer, who changed the family name from Voytka to Voight, although a back injury kept him from competing, and he taught the game, instead. One brother, Wes, became songwriter Chip Taylor, while another became a geologist, with a specialty in volcanoes. Raised a Roman Catholic, he wanted to be an actor from childhood, and got his chance in high school, playing Puck in a school production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.’” Received a BA from Catholic Univ. in Washington, DC, majoring in art. 6’3”, blonde and blue-eyed. Spent a brief period in the army reserves, then moved to NYC to be an actor, studying at the Neighborhood Playhouse. Made an inauspicious off-Broadway debut, and in 1962 married Lori Peters, an actress. Continued to work in the theater and appeared on a number of TV series over the next 5 years, but did not make his film debut until 1967 in a pair of bit roles in a crime spoof, and a western, unconsciously reflecting his previous go-round in this series. Divorced soon afterwards. Had a huge breakthrough in 1969, in Midnight Cowboy, playing a naive male hustler from Texas in NYC. The movie would become the only x-rated feature to win Best Picture, and it established him as a star, after initially getting mixed reviews. Able to take on several subsequent high profile roles, while always looking for challenging parts, rather than replaying himself, so that he only did a half dozen films over the next five years, which would include Deliverance. In 1971, he married model and part Iroquois Marceline Bertrard, son James Haven, an actor, and daughter Angelina Jolie Voight from the union, with the latter becoming a megastar after dropping her last name. Did charity work with a whole variety of groups, and had a second peak role towards the end of the decade as an angry paraplegic Viet vet in Coming Home, which garnered him an Oscar for Best Actor in 1978, at the same time his marriage ended. Wound up permanently estranged from his daughter, as his career took precedence over everything else in his life, save his charity work. At the end of the 1980s, he claimed to have had a spiritual awakening, while dividing the next decade between the small and large screen to good effect, gradually transforming himself from lead to character parts and supporting roles. Became more politically conservative as he grew older, supporting the Republican fear machine in the war on terror, while extolling the highly exploitative Rudy Giuliani as an “angel,” for cleaning up NYC, in his abortive bid for the presidential nomination. Joined the cast of his first TV series in 2010, “Lone Star,” only to see it yanked after only two episodes for low viewership. Given to periodic public fulminations over perceived political misperceptions by fellow spotlighted figures disagreeing with his heavily stilted and righteously rightward view of things. Inner: Highly idealistic, with strong Catholic sensibilities and a powerful belief in American and Israeli exceptionalism, no matter their actions to the contrary. Mid-day cowboy lifetime of trying to find a balance and center in work and flag-waving activism as a means of offsetting any residue anti-sociality from his previous go-round in this series, due in large part to a strongly religious overview and an unbending desire to “do good,” as he sees it. Henry Starr (1873-1921) - American outlaw. Outer: Grandfather was the violent renegade Tom Starr (Randolph Scott). Mother was of Irish descent and 1/4 Cherokee, father was 1/2 Cherokee. The former was related to the outlaw Starr clan, including Sam Starr (Billy Bob Thornton) and Belle Starr (Angelina Jolie), who was an aunt through her marriage to the former. Disliked the notorious Belle, however, finding her far too crude for his tastes. When he was 13, his father died, leaving his mother to care for his two siblings and the family farm. Despised the abusive man she quickly married, because he had no Amerindian blood, forcing him to leave home as a young teen. Worked as a cowboy at ranches, and at 18 was arrested for stealing a horse. Jumped bail, and officially began his outlaw life afterwards, joining a gang that robbed stores and rail depots. Killed a lawman who had been trailing him, then added banks and railroads to his criminal c.v., so that he was an infamous outlaw by the time he reached the tender age of 20, with a $5000 price tag on his head. Despite the law’s hot pursuit, he continued his daring daylight robberies, until he was nabbed in Colorado Springs on his way to California, along with a woman who claimed to be his wife. Sentenced to hang in the subsequent trial, his lawyers took his case to the Supreme Court. A second trial came to the same conclusion, and a third trial was ordered, where he pleaded guilty to manslaughter and robbery, and was sentenced to 15 years in prison. While there, he helped disarm a prisoner through negotiation, and in 1901, when he applied for a pardon, it was granted him two years later, with no less than Pres. Theodore Roosevelt (Kathleen Kennedy) expressing admiration for his earlier defusion action. Went to Tulsa and worked in his mother’s restaurant, and married a second time. Named his son after TR, and was leading an honest life, before authorities demanded his extradition for an earlier 1893 robbery. Took to the hills immediately afterwards, and resumed his outlaw ways with some of his old gang, robbing banks and trying to stay ahead of the law. Betrayed by an old friend, he was caught while hiding and extradited to Colorado in 1908, where he pled guilty and was sentenced to 7-25 years. Studied law in the prison library, wrote his autobiography, Thrilling Events, Life of Henry Starr, and won parole in 1913, with the proviso he never leave Colorado. Promptly did so, returning to old habits and old habitats, and over the next two years, pulled off 14 daring daylight bank heists, only to be wounded and captured. Pled guilty and was sentenced to 25 years in the Oklahoma State Penn. While there, he became a public penitent, warning young people off a life of crime, and won an early parole in 1919 for his efforts. Stayed straight for two years, even appearing in a film, A Debtor to the Law, which he produced and starred in. The latter was a huge success, leading him into further local starring turns, although he turned down a Hollywood offer for fear it would lead to another extradition. Married a third time, but the black hat lure proved far too compelling, and he wound up robbing one last bank, with a getaway car as his mount, rather than a horse, only to be shot in the back by its president. Died the following morning, surrounded by his mother, wife and son. Compiled some impressive statistics in his robberies, netting some $60,000, and doing more banks, 21, than any of his notorious contemporaries. Never ratted on any of his cohorts, and was always more than willing to take chances. Inner: Courageous, intelligent and constantly thrill-seeking. Daredevil lifetime of abiding by the dictum that to live outside the law you must be honest in your dishonesty.

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PATHWAYS OF THE PERFORMER AS ASTUTE ACCUMULATOR:
Storyline: The square-jawed acquisitor turns in his real weapons for studio props, while continuing to chase after money, although from a heroic, rather than a reprehensible perspective, letting the high country supersede his earlier low road, while limiting his outlawry to gossip rather than violent legend.

Randolph Scott (George Randolph Crane) (1898-1987) - American actor. Outer: Father was an engineer in a textile firm, mother was daughter to a wealthy North Carolina family. Born in Virginia, while his parents were on vacation, as the only son among five sisters. Raised an Episcopalian, and always took his spirituality seriously. Grew up in wealth and privilege in North Carolina and attended private schools, evincing strong athletic skills. At the outset of America’s entry into WW I, he joined the army and served in France as an artillery observer, and then enrolled in artillery officer’s school, winning a commission following the fray. Came back to America afterwards, and played football for Georgia Tech, although a back injury ended his active athletic career. Transferred to the Univ. of North Carolina, where he pursued his father’s profession, textile engineering. 6’2”, with a rugged masculinity. Without his dreams of athletic glory, college proved far less interesting to him, and he dropped out and went to work in his sire’s textile firm as an accountant. Still dreaming of glory, he abandoned the security of his job and in 1927 headed out to Hollywood, where he met producer Howard Hughes while golfing and landed a small role in Sharp Shooters. Changed his name to Randolph Scott and spent the early sound era as an extra and bit player, while also burnishing his extremely limited acting skills at the Pasadena Playhouse. Got his first lead in 1931, and after gaining more stage experience, signed a seven year contract with Paramount Pictures. By 1932, he was on his way to becoming a B-movie western star, making some 60 oaters, including a number of Zane Grey adaptations that had earlier been silent vehicles for Jack Holt (Billy Bob Thornton), and were reused and reshot on the cheap. Did other genres as well, and, at mid-decade point, he was a genuine movie star, having moved up to ‘A’ productions in a variety of modes, including musicals, on loan out to other studios. During this period, he roomed with actor Cary Grant for over a decade, and though the two were rumored to be lovers, the innuendo was never solidly proven, despite dogging him for the rest of his life, with several tell-all tomes later attesting to its veracity. In 1936, he married Mariana duPont Somerville, an heiress to the Du Pont fortune, as her second husband, which would put him in step to making his own considerable fortune. The mismatch, however, was over soon after it began, and the couple divorced three years later. When his contract expired, he did both supports and leads, including a turn in Belle Starr, unconsciously touching on his early go-round root. Occasionally played villains, but his stock in trade was the hero, thanks in large part to his limitations as an actor, since the latter was far easier to assess and fit in with his physical make-up, which had grown handsomely leathery with added age. Tried to get an officer’s commission in the Marines at the start of WW II, but his old football injury precluded it, and he wound up doing war movies instead, while performing live shows for the war effort. Married a second time Patricia Stillman, in 1944, after ending his domestic scene with Grant, adopted son and daughter from the union. The postwar period would see him producing his own westerns, and usually playing an upright lawman. Ended his film career with, perhaps, his greatest film, the classic Ride the High Country in 1962. Retired afterwards with an estate in excess of $100 million, thanks to shrewd investments all along the way in oil wells, real estate and securities. Eschewed the Hollywood scene, while golfing almost every day. Died of a heart attack and lung ailments. Tom Starr (c1813-1890) - American outlaw. Outer: Of full-blooded Cherokee descent. One of 21 brothers and sisters. His father was a leader of the displaced Cherokee nation, after it was moved west of the Mississippi. In a treaty dispute in 1835 between two opposing factions that arose out of the move, he, along with one of his sons, was killed. Swore over his father’s grave that he would avenge his death. Organizing a band of followers comprised of his brothers and cousins, he carried out his oath of vengeance with 20 murders in what would become known as the Tom Starr War, which lasted about five years. Finally made a treaty with his enemies, although others continued to try to kill him, but he managed to continually elude death, while accruing many stories to his legend. Following the Civil War, he and his sons sold whiskey and rustled livestock, and he became quite wealthy through his outlaw ways, while living in relative peace and protection. Had a large family, to whom he was devoted, including Sam Starr (BIlly Bob Thornton), and spent his later life regaling old friends with stories of his shoot-em-up younger days. Inner: Seemingly protected by the forces of fate, in a go-round of hairbreadth escapes and much violent derring-do. Live by the knife, but die by the peace pipe lifetime of evincing his usual expertise with accruing wealth, after proving himself over and over again as a man of exceptional violence, courage, and most of all, continued good luck.

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PATHWAY OF THE PERFORMER AS CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK:
Storyline: The reformed performer joins his longtime crypto-family in the self-rehabilitative field of play-acting, gravitating naturally to action and western roles, before finally tiring of them, but never quite finding something satisfactory as a substitution, prior to searching anew for self-fulfillment in a new era.
Lucas Black (1982) - American actor. Outer: Mother was an office worker, father toiled in a museum. Third of three children with an older brother and sister. Didn’t watch many movies while growing up, although without taking any acting lessons, he began his film career at the age of 11, following an open casting call at the urging of his mother, with The War, which gained him an ongoing part in the short-lived series, “American Gothic,” the following year. Reunited with his crypto-father from his previous go-round, Billy Bob Thornton in Sling Blade, playing a child who befriends him, before doing some modeling for Calvin Klein, while refusing to go to Hollywood, and, instead, continue to live in Alabama. Good athlete in high school, playing a variety of sports, including football and basketball. 5’10”, and known as ‘Lucky’ to his friends. Scored his first lead in the indie Crazy in Alabama, in 1999, after turning down a star turn in The Horse Whisperers the previous year because he refused to alter his distinctive southern accent. Continued his career upon graduating high school in 2001, while expressing an interest in studying fish biology, because of his enthusiasm for bass fishing. Starred in Friday Night Lights in 2004 with Thornton once again, while also assaying young Texans in several films. Despite his early successes, he remains ambivalent about acting, seeing it as a means to his ultimate end to become a professional sport fisherman. Moved to Missouri, with that thought in mind, while continuing to show an athletic versatility in all the characters he portrays on film. Inner: Outdoorsy, natural, unpretentious. Enjoys playing roles reflecting elements of himself, rather than totally reconstructing characters. Down home lifetime of finding easy mass acceptance as a celluloid figure, while continuing to search for fulfillment off-screen in his ongoing desire to truly be himself on as many levels as possible. Tim Holt (Charles John Holt III) (1918-1973) - American actor. Outer: Father was actor Jack Holt (Billy Bob Thornton). One sister who became a western B-movie actress under the name of Jennifer Holt. Grew up around movie sets, and had a kiddie role in one of his sire’s silents. Raised on his father’s Fresno ranch. Went to a prestigious boarding school, Culver Military Academy, In Indiana, where his roommate was Hal Roach, Jr., scion of the famed comedy movie produce. Proved to be a standout polo player there, just as his father had been. Went to USC, where he met and married Virginia Ashcroft in 1938. 5’10”. Decided on an acting career and worked in stock as an apprenticeship, before appearing in westerns in the late 1930s. By the early 1940s, he had his own cowboy series at RKO, doing some 18 of them, replete with funky sidekicks, from 1940 to 1943. Also did some straight dramas, before joining the Air Force, where he served as a lieutenant and bombardier, and wound up wounded on the very last day of the fray in a bombing raid over Tokyo. Continued as a B Western star after the war, and reached his cinematic peak in 1948 in Treasure of the Sierra Madre, in which his father had a cameo role. Made some 29 westerns for RKO, which were noted for their solid production values, and was one of the top ten western stars of that era. Following his final one in 1952, he largely abandoned Hollywood, appearing in only a couple of films over the next two decades, while also making personal appearances. After another marriage and divorce, he married Berdee Stephens in 1952, and found a permanent partner in her, which probably influenced his leaving Hollywood and moving to Oklahoma. Sold advertising for a TV station, while one of his last jobs was hosting a Saturday morning TV show of westerns. Died of bone cancer. Inner: Had fast hands, and was clocked at 1/6 of a second on his movie draw, winning him the accolade as cinema’s fastest draw. Quick draw but slow fade lifetime of finding limited fame and fortune as a celluloid hero, before searching for something better to replace it, but never quite discovering it, necessitating a relatively early exit, despite his successes. Jim Reed (?-1874) - American outlaw. Outer: Early life ill-recorded. His parents knew the Shirleys, who were the progenitors of his future wife. Fought with Quantrill’s Raiders during the Civil War, along with the Youngers (the Carradines) and the James Brothers (Sean Penn & Dennis Hopper), and following the fray, joined them in their outlawry, fleeing with them to Texas, when they became wanted men. Reconnected with the future Belle Starr (Angelina Jolie) while there, and married her in 1866. One daughter and one son from the union. Got involved with the Tom Starr (Randolph Scott) gang, a whiskey-selling and cattle-rustling outfit, and killed a man for having gunned down an older brother, forcing both him and Belle to flee to California, with a writ against him for not only murder, but also bringing whiskey into Indian Territory. While there, he was accused of passing counterfeit money, forcing him to flee authorities and hightail it back to Texas, where he became involved with the James-Younger gang, as well as his original outlaw outfit. More mayhem ensued, including his involvement with another woman, while he continually used Indian Territory to elude lawmen. Robbed a stage, and though his wife was not a participant, she was named as an accessory. Fled the law once again, but was killed by a deputy sheriff later that year, when he tried to escape from his custody. Inner: Live fast, die young lifetime of hanging with a bad boy crew who were all destined for filmdom the following century, as wanted men and women of an entirely different order.

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